Course Information

FdSc Agriculture and Environment

FdSc Agriculture and Environment

FdSc 2.5 Years Department of Agriculture Holbeach Campus [B], Riseholme Campus [R] Validated DF47 FdSc 2.5 Years Department of Agriculture Holbeach Campus [B], Riseholme Campus [R] Validated DF47

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University of Lincoln Excels in Agriculture

The University of Lincoln’s Agriculture courses are ranked 8th in the UK and 1st for student satisfaction within The Times and Sunday Times  Good University Guide 2014.

The programme was initiated through consultation with representatives of the land-based industries and employer forums to provide development opportunities for those who already hold or are aspiring to key roles in the land based and environmental sectors, and to help the industry meet the growing need for skilled technicians and managers.

The curriculum reflects the aspirations of employers to see those working at managerial and technical level demonstrate flexibility through knowledge of a range of subjects and develop effective people and management skills, whilst acknowledging the need for well developed skills in specific disciplines.

Your course will benefit from the input of industry through farm and site visits, sector exhibitions and conferences, and seminars led by industry experts.

Introduction

This part-time foundation degree has been designed to meet the individual interests and career aspirations of students together with needs of the agricultural industry. It provides opportunities for those who are aspiring to key roles in the land based sectors, and helps meet the need for technicians and managers.

The programme reflects the recent developments and trends in consumer demands, markets, resources, European and global trade agreements; whilst a strong emphasis is placed upon the changes in environmental perspectives, resource management and sustainability.

How You Study

All students will attend an induction to the programme. Modules on the day release programme are taught through lectures, seminars and tutorials and practical/laboratory-based sessions. Individual modules also have elements of farm and site visits, sector exhibitions and conferences, and seminars led by industry experts.

How You Are Assessed

Modules are assessed through the means of written scientific reports, written projects, group and individual presentations and phase tests. The type of assessment will depend upon the subject matter of the module. Students will also undertake a work-based project in which the majority of the research will take place at their place of employment under the supervision of an employer mentor and an academic tutor.

Entry Requirements

180pts. Ideally candidates will have been employed in a managerial or supervisory role in the agricultural or related sector.

GCSE Requirements. Three GCSEs at grade C or above to include Maths,English Language, and science.

Level 1

Academic and Professional Development

Students will be encouraged to develop their basic statistical and mathematical knowledge in a way that will develop confidence and equip them with the necessary skills to support their study, both during the programme and in the workplace. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their learning, studying and presentation skills, together with written and verbal communication and ICT skills, including Microsoft Word and Excel.

Environmental Science

This module links into other areas of study within the programme, including sustainable environmental management. It introduces the student to the concepts of environmental science and provides an awareness of the consequences of increased human and environmental demands on global ecosystems. It focuses on the ecology of natural and managed systems, and the impact of human activities on those systems and upon air, soil and water pollution. Students will investigate global population footprints, ecology and surveying skills and the public perspective and expectations of environmental protection. The impact of climate change on ecosystems will be examined along with developing concepts including transition to a low carbon economy.

Farm Mechanisation

The module aims to develop students understanding of criteria used to select appropriate machines and machinery systems for a range of different farming situations. They will also learn about performance monitoring of machines and adaptations that relate to precision farming. An overview of key health and safety requirements, together with aspects of relevant legislation, will also be provided.

Introduction to Finance and Business

The module will provide the student with the basic principles of business management and finance, and will look at the strategic approach to management. This will include operational management, organisational resources and what gives a business a competitive advantage. The student will also investigate supply chain management, a vital aspect of agri-food businesses. They will also learn about quality management, human resource management and lean manufacturing, and how these aspects can contribute to the success of a business.

Integral to managing quality and resources is the management of finance. Students will be introduced to the nature and purpose of accounting, key concepts and how to read a balance sheet. They will become familiar with how income and expenditure are measured, including trial balances, cash flow and budgeting.

Livestock Production

The principle focus of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the major livestock production systems and their design in the context of UK and world food production. Management techniques will be reviewed and their commercial implications considered. Particular reference will be made to the economic, social and environmental constraints on production, and the importance of animal health and welfare.

Policies and Markets

This module will encourage you to appreciate the overarching role played by international agreements on trade, in the production of food on any scale in theUK. You will gain an understanding of the global perspectives and political dimensions which impact on food production in theUK. This will enable you to more easily assess the direction of the business and how to comply with legislation and directives, as well as consumer influence. The module also reviews the impact of new technologies on food production, and examines how currency and exchange rate fluctuations can affect the market and business opportunities.

Principles Of Animal Science

Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of animal science. The module is designed to develop their knowledge and understanding of the similarities and differences in anatomy and physiology of animals (cattle, sheep and pigs), in addition to poultry. This knowledge will provide a basis for the student to develop their understanding of how the producer may manipulate growth and development of the animal, through nutritional programmes for example, to produce livestock which meets the demands of the market and consumer.

Principles Of Crop Science

This module investigates the principles of crop science which will be further developed in the Crop Husbandry and Crop Production modules. The areas of focus are soils, plants, pests and diseases. The emphasis is on practical techniques, so much of the work is laboratory based. Selected examples of a range of monocotyledons and dicotyledons will be used to illustrate nutritional and physiological aspects of plant growth.

Level 2

Business Management

In this module the student will develop a clear understanding of the importance of managing budgets and the processes involved therein, as a key management tool. The student will study the elements of cash flow and acquire an understanding of elements involved in making investment choices and the options available for sources of finance.

Crop Husbandry (Agriculture and Environment)

Students will be provided with an overview of the principles of crop production, from pre-cropping preparations through to harvest and storage. Particular attention is given to environmental considerations and the requirements of cross compliance. A focus of the module will be growing for a market, and the student will have the opportunity to learn how the choice of crop, variety and cultural practice is driven by the demands of the market.

Crop Production

This module aims to develop an understanding of the systems, including organic, used to produce of a range of crop types. Production systems will be compared with particular reference to political, economic and environmental factors. Delivery is primarily by illustrated lectures and farm/crop visits. Lecture work will be augmented by each student undertaking a critical report on a ‘real’ crop system of their choosing.

Opportunities and Technologies in Agriculture

Students will examine strategies for assessing new opportunities and technologies in agriculture. They will learn how innovation and diversification enhances the UK’s competitive performance in a way that contributes to sustainable and environmental objectives. This will include introducing the students to different sectors of the industry in order to understand the challenges faced. The module will also allow students to develop the business skills needed to assess how new technology can be viable in their own workplace.

Resource Management

The module will allow the student to investigate the broad issues of resource management as the resource agenda changes.

Students will investigate the hydrological principles fundamental to the solution of management problems in surface waters and groundwater, including the issues of diffuse pollution, water catchment management, irrigation and the establishment of reservoirs, groundwater protection zones and NVZ’s. Students will also develop an understanding of how waste arises, (particularly from agriculture and primary producers and the food manufacturing industry), and the options for treatment and management of that waste, whilst considering the principle of “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”. The link between waste and energy will be examined, including anaerobic digestion, and how energy might be conserved in relation to primary food production operations. This will be also examined against a background of food safety and quality, including HACCP. As renewable energy becomes increasingly important, energy efficiency and the potential for alternative energy will be considered.

Sustainable Environmental Management

This module will encourage students to engage with the principles of sustainability and look at how this concept is vital to rural areas. Students will learn about critical issues affecting communities, such as the rapid increase in growth of the UK’s rural population, changes in the local infrastructure and continuing financial challenges for the agricultural sector. The module also covers topics such as resource protection and management, biodiversity, conservation and ecology, implementation of Integrated Crop Management (ICM), Integrated Farm Management (IFM) and assurance and environmental stewardship schemes. It will also look at the potential consequences of climate change and the role of government and non-government organisations in conservation and environmental issues.

Work Based Project - Agriculture

This project is an individual investigation of a specific topic, which is normally of direct relevance to an individual’s employment. The work based project module provides the student with the opportunity to develop their specialism within the fields of agriculture and the environment. The research for the project will be undertaken at the student’s workplace under the supervision of both an employer mentor and academic tutor.

Special Features & Research Highlights

Foundation Degrees are higher education qualifications that are distinctive by their vocational nature, having been developed in partnership with employers. They are intended to provide access to higher education to those at work, and to wherever possible, link and accredit opportunities for learning afforded at work. Delivery and assessment are inherently linked to the workplace and hence employer support is a key requirement for those joining the programme. It is intended that the majority of students will be employed and sponsored by their employer.

The FdSc in Agriculture and Environment aims to provide:

  • Technical knowledge and skills in primary food production (livestock and arable), environmental and resource management, marketing and business management;
  • Skills in leadership and personal development;
  • An understanding of health and safety and other legislative compliance;
  • Generic and key skills such as communication, decision making, critical analysis, creative thinking and project management;
  • Skills to progress your career within the sector and to make a valued contribution to the businesses that have supported you and to the industry as a whole.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Facilities

Students at the Riseholme Park campus have all the benefits of city living, whilst studying and learning within the peaceful, unspoilt and natural environment of a beautiful parkland campus just 3 miles north of Lincoln city centre. The Riseholme Park estate has its own agricultural facilities situated on two sites which provide access to real life industry experience for students. Riseholme Park Farms Ltd farms 369 hectares of the 415 hectare estate owned by the University, with the remaining area used to provide practical opportunities for agriculture programmes. Livestock enterprises include a sheep flock and a pedigree herd of Lincoln Red cattle. Lodge Farm in the neighbouring village of Nettleham is wholly arable, producing winter wheat, winter barley, winter OSR and sugar beet. You will also have access to the specialist food manufacturing facilities at the Holbeach Campus which is home to the National Centre for Food Manufacturing. This will provide you with the opportunity to appreciate and have a greater understanding of the whole food chain.

Career Opportunities

This foundation degree prepares you for a career as a farm manager, procurement manager, agronomist, technical advisor or consultant. It is ideal for those who wish to develop their own business within the sector.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/studentcareersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

Introduction

The global food supply chain requires productivity and sustainability. This Foundation degree has been designed to ensure that graduates are equipped to tackle this challenge and take up key roles in the land-based and environmental sectors.

Developed through close consultation with experts from the land-based industries, this course reflects employers’ requirements for graduates with relevant knowledge, management abilities and well-developed skills.

Throughout your studies, you engage with the global agriculture industry through farm and site visits, exhibitions, conferences and seminars led by industry experts. Course content is informed by recent developments in agriculture, sustainability and cutting-edge research carried out by academics in our Department of Agriculture.

How You Study

All students will attend an induction to the programme, where modules are taught through lectures, seminars and tutorials and practical/laboratory-based sessions. Some modules also have elements of farm and site visits, sector exhibitions and conferences, and seminars led by industry experts.

How You Are Assessed

Modules are assessed through written scientific reports, written projects, group and individual presentations and phase tests. The type of assessment will depend upon the subject matter of the module. Students will also undertake a work-based project in which the majority of the research will take place at their place of employment under the supervision of an employer mentor and an academic tutor.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a minimum of 180 UCAS Tariff points, three GCSEs at grade C or above (to include Maths, English Language, and a science subject), and ideally will have been employed in a managerial or supervisory role in the agricultural or related sector.

The University of Lincoln accepts a wide range of qualifications, including A Levels, AS Levels, the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas.

Level 1

Academic and Professional Development

Students will be encouraged to develop their basic statistical and mathematical knowledge in a way that will develop confidence and equip them with the necessary skills to support their study, both during the programme and in the workplace. Students will also have the opportunity to develop their learning, studying and presentation skills, together with written and verbal communication and ICT skills, including Microsoft Word and Excel.

Environmental Science

This module links into other areas of study within the programme, including sustainable environmental management. It introduces the student to the concepts of environmental science and provides an awareness of the consequences of increased human and environmental demands on global ecosystems. It focuses on the ecology of natural and managed systems, and the impact of human activities on those systems and upon air, soil and water pollution. Students will investigate global population footprints, ecology and surveying skills and the public perspective and expectations of environmental protection. The impact of climate change on ecosystems will be examined along with developing concepts including transition to a low carbon economy.

Farm Mechanisation

The module aims to develop students understanding of criteria used to select appropriate machines and machinery systems for a range of different farming situations. They will also learn about performance monitoring of machines and adaptations that relate to precision farming. An overview of key health and safety requirements, together with aspects of relevant legislation, will also be provided.

Introduction to Finance and Business

The module will provide the student with the basic principles of business management and finance, and will look at the strategic approach to management. This will include operational management, organisational resources and what gives a business a competitive advantage. The student will also investigate supply chain management, a vital aspect of agri-food businesses. They will also learn about quality management, human resource management and lean manufacturing, and how these aspects can contribute to the success of a business.

Integral to managing quality and resources is the management of finance. Students will be introduced to the nature and purpose of accounting, key concepts and how to read a balance sheet. They will become familiar with how income and expenditure are measured, including trial balances, cash flow and budgeting.

Livestock Production

The principle focus of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the major livestock production systems and their design in the context of UK and world food production. Management techniques will be reviewed and their commercial implications considered. Particular reference will be made to the economic, social and environmental constraints on production, and the importance of animal health and welfare.

Policies and Markets

This module will encourage you to appreciate the overarching role played by international agreements on trade, in the production of food on any scale in theUK. You will gain an understanding of the global perspectives and political dimensions which impact on food production in theUK. This will enable you to more easily assess the direction of the business and how to comply with legislation and directives, as well as consumer influence. The module also reviews the impact of new technologies on food production, and examines how currency and exchange rate fluctuations can affect the market and business opportunities.

Principles Of Animal Science

Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of animal science. The module is designed to develop their knowledge and understanding of the similarities and differences in anatomy and physiology of animals (cattle, sheep and pigs), in addition to poultry. This knowledge will provide a basis for the student to develop their understanding of how the producer may manipulate growth and development of the animal, through nutritional programmes for example, to produce livestock which meets the demands of the market and consumer.

Principles Of Crop Science

This module investigates the principles of crop science which will be further developed in the Crop Husbandry and Crop Production modules. The areas of focus are soils, plants, pests and diseases. The emphasis is on practical techniques, so much of the work is laboratory based. Selected examples of a range of monocotyledons and dicotyledons will be used to illustrate nutritional and physiological aspects of plant growth.

Level 2

Business Management

In this module the student will develop a clear understanding of the importance of managing budgets and the processes involved therein, as a key management tool. The student will study the elements of cash flow and acquire an understanding of elements involved in making investment choices and the options available for sources of finance.

Crop Husbandry (Agriculture and Environment)

Students will be provided with an overview of the principles of crop production, from pre-cropping preparations through to harvest and storage. Particular attention is given to environmental considerations and the requirements of cross compliance. A focus of the module will be growing for a market, and the student will have the opportunity to learn how the choice of crop, variety and cultural practice is driven by the demands of the market.

Crop Production

This module aims to develop an understanding of the systems, including organic, used to produce of a range of crop types. Production systems will be compared with particular reference to political, economic and environmental factors. Delivery is primarily by illustrated lectures and farm/crop visits. Lecture work will be augmented by each student undertaking a critical report on a ‘real’ crop system of their choosing.

Opportunities and Technologies in Agriculture

Students will examine strategies for assessing new opportunities and technologies in agriculture. They will learn how innovation and diversification enhances the UK’s competitive performance in a way that contributes to sustainable and environmental objectives. This will include introducing the students to different sectors of the industry in order to understand the challenges faced. The module will also allow students to develop the business skills needed to assess how new technology can be viable in their own workplace.

Resource Management

The module will allow the student to investigate the broad issues of resource management as the resource agenda changes.

Students will investigate the hydrological principles fundamental to the solution of management problems in surface waters and groundwater, including the issues of diffuse pollution, water catchment management, irrigation and the establishment of reservoirs, groundwater protection zones and NVZ’s. Students will also develop an understanding of how waste arises, (particularly from agriculture and primary producers and the food manufacturing industry), and the options for treatment and management of that waste, whilst considering the principle of “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle”. The link between waste and energy will be examined, including anaerobic digestion, and how energy might be conserved in relation to primary food production operations. This will be also examined against a background of food safety and quality, including HACCP. As renewable energy becomes increasingly important, energy efficiency and the potential for alternative energy will be considered.

Sustainable Environmental Management

This module will encourage students to engage with the principles of sustainability and look at how this concept is vital to rural areas. Students will learn about critical issues affecting communities, such as the rapid increase in growth of the UK’s rural population, changes in the local infrastructure and continuing financial challenges for the agricultural sector. The module also covers topics such as resource protection and management, biodiversity, conservation and ecology, implementation of Integrated Crop Management (ICM), Integrated Farm Management (IFM) and assurance and environmental stewardship schemes. It will also look at the potential consequences of climate change and the role of government and non-government organisations in conservation and environmental issues.

Work Based Project - Agriculture

This project is an individual investigation of a specific topic, which is normally of direct relevance to an individual’s employment. The work based project module provides the student with the opportunity to develop their specialism within the fields of agriculture and the environment. The research for the project will be undertaken at the student’s workplace under the supervision of both an employer mentor and academic tutor.

Special Features & Research Highlights

Foundation Degrees are Higher Education qualifications that are distinctive by their vocational nature, having been developed in partnership with employers. They are intended to provide access to higher education to those at work, and to wherever possible, link and accredit opportunities for learning afforded at work. Delivery and assessment are inherently linked to the workplace and hence employer support is a key requirement for those joining the programme. It is intended that the majority of students will be employed and sponsored by their employer.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Facilities

Our Agriculture and Environment students are based at the beautiful country setting of Riseholme Park. They enjoy the benefits of city living, while studying in the unspoilt natural landscape of our parkland campus, just three miles north of the city of Lincoln. The Riseholme Park estate comprises 369 hectares of farmland and 45 hectares of practical agricultural teaching space, complete with its own sheep flock and pedigree Lincoln Red cattle.

Lodge Farm in the neighbouring village of Nettleham is wholly arable, producing winter wheat, winter barley, winter oilseed rape and sugar beet. You will also have access to the specialist food manufacturing facilities at the Holbeach Campus which is home to the National Centre for Food Manufacturing. This will provide you with a greater understanding of the whole food chain.

Career Opportunities

This Foundation degree prepares you for a career in a range of roles in agriculture and associated industries, including farm manager, procurement manager, agronomist, technical adviser or consultant. It also provides a solid foundation for anyone looking to develop their own business within the sector.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/studentcareersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/internationalscholarships/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages. Occasionally provision may be altered in order to meet changing circumstances or to keep courses up to date with trends and developments in subject areas. Specific programme queries should be directed to the teaching department. Fees for all our courses may increase each year in line with government regulations and are subject to change.


Always check our website for the latest information about entry tariffs, fees & funding before making your application to the University.