Course Information

BA (Hons) Business Studies

BA (Hons) Business Studies

BA (Hons) 3 or 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 260 points N100 BA (Hons) 3 or 4 years Lincoln Business School Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 260 points N100

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Overseas Applicants


For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One learning experience. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.


Further information about the International Year One

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Clearing 2014

This course is available for 2014 entry.
Call the Clearing Hotline on 01522 886622.

Excellent Employment Prospects

Ninety-five per cent of Lincoln Business Studies graduates were in work or further study six months after completing their course, according to the most recent Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education Survey.

Students will gain a sound grasp of the principles of business, with considerable choice in terms of higher level modules.

As they develop their understanding of particular topics, they will be able to specialise, if they wish, in a particular subject area, such as Finance, Management or Marketing in the final year. Thus, the course provides fully rounded business graduates with academic subject opportunities that are often only available on specialist programmes.

Introduction

BA (Hons) Business Studies is ideal for those students wanting to work in business or to start and run their own businesses. It develops critical thinking and reflective skills and builds a broad knowledge of business to give students the skills to progress up the management ladder within an organisation. Students will gain a range of contemporary business skills and knowledge which can be employed in a variety of business contexts.

The Business Studies course combines intellectual rigour with personal development. It provides an academic grounding in topics such as finance, human resource management, operations, marketing and strategy from an international perspective. Our aim is to enable the personal development of each individual student and this is a key focus of the course.

Our academics are research active and have real-world expertise. They engage experts in the course to create learning scenarios which are demanding and challenging and which will ensure that students develop the skills they will need for a successful future career.

Is This Course Right For Me?

The Business course combines intellectual rigour with personal development.

It provides an academic grounding in topics such as finance, human resource management, operations, marketing and strategy. Our aim is to enable the personal development of each individual student and this is a key focus of the course.

How You Study

Students are encouraged to develop independence in their thinking and managing their own time within a framework of direction and support offered by teaching staff. Throughout the course, students are sensitised to issues of codes of professional conduct and ethical behaviour.

Most modules include some lectures. These are designed to inspire and motivate students, introduce them to particular topics and give an overview of current issues and debates within the discipline. Some are given by visiting practitioners who provide 'live' case material and offer students industry contacts and careers advice. In addition to tutor-directed seminars, students are encouraged to form their own learning and support groupings.

Our approach is one of collaboration between staff and students. Emphasis is put on using the student group as a resource for learning. In seminars, which typically involve numbers of fewer than 20, students are able to articulate their own thoughts and clarify ideas through discussion with others. A variety of learning methods are used including in-class group exercises, discussions, presentations, evaluation of sample material, and case study analysis. Student participation is encouraged from the start and set as the norm for the rest of the course. Students are expected to prepare prescribed material for seminars as well as generally keep abreast of current developments in their discipline.

How You Are Assessed

A wide range of assessment strategies are used both to facilitate the testing of a wide range of learning outcomes and to reflect the student’s varying learning styles.

Students are expected to move in a continuous process from a dependent learning state to one of independence.

At the end of the degree course, it is expected that students will be much more autonomous and reflexive individuals equipped with a set of skills which will enable them to operate successfully in society and the world of work.

What We Look For In Your Application

Curiosity, energy, interest and commitment.

No specific skills are required, although an interest and curiosity about the world of business is valued.

The course is contemporary and practical and involves a good deal of participation and problem-based learning.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a minimum of 260 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of two A Levels (or the equivalent). In addition to the minimum of two A Levels, other qualifications such as AS Levels, the Extended Project and the ASDAN CoPE for example, will be counted towards the 260 point requirement.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English Language and Maths.

Applications are welcomed from mature students who are studying towards an Access to Higher Education programme. We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data

This introduces some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It promotes a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students practise the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Contemporary Business Analysis

Students are introduced to a range of economic concepts and basic analytical techniques. Upon successful completion students are able to:

  • Explain the workings of the price mechanism, the labour market and various forms of market failure
  • Explain the relationship between the firm’s costs, revenues, prices and outputs within various market structures
  • Analyse the interaction between entrepreneur, the firm and its external environment
  • Analyse the inter-relationships between government and key macro-economic indicators
  • Understand the links between the internal and external economy and how this impacts on the firm and its external environment.

Financial Communications

Students develop an understanding of the relevance of finance and accounting and some of the current issues facing business people. It is not an introduction to the technical side of accounting, rather, non-specialists can gain the ability to understand and comment upon issues which will arise upon pursuing a business career. Most organisations spend considerable time and money producing 'Financial Communications' and the module examines the underlying reasons behind this behaviour and the extent to which these communications achieve their objectives.

Introduction to Business Law

This serves as an introduction to the English legal system and English contract law. The module is designed to give students a basic understanding of contract issues in England and will enable students to appreciate when a legally binding agreement comes into existence, the obligations involved and the consequences of breaking such agreements. Contract law underpins a company’s dealings with its customers, employees and suppliers. It is important that students appreciate the legal context in which everyday business decisions are made.

Organisational Behaviour 1: Evolving Perspectives of Management

(Option) It is suggested that organisational structure affects human behaviour in organisations and that strategy, structure and culture are closely related, although rarely considered together. To set contemporary management behaviour in context, an understanding of the evolution of management theory is necessary, together with a consideration of organisational structure. Accordingly, a number of competing and contrasting perspectives of past and present thinking on management are explored, together with an acknowledgement that some approaches are complementary, whilst others are in conflict and recognition that 'new' management thinking and methods may simply be repackaged familiar, old ideas. The term 'organisational behaviour' relates to the activities and interactions of people in organisations. Organisational behaviour has been defined as the 'inter-disciplinary body of knowledge and field of research, concerned with how formal organisations, behaviour of people within organisations and salient features of their context and environment, evolve and take shape, why all these things happen the way they do and what purposes they serve'. In considering the changing and evolving roles of management and managers, the module acknowledges that the study of organisational behaviour is multi-disciplinary and draws in particular from psychology, social psychology, sociology, economics and political science.

Organisational Behaviour 2: Management in Context

(Option) This module focuses on the impact of group dynamics on the individual, the impact of personality when working with others, and considers the impact of both group dynamics and personality on the workplace from a management perspective. The module seeks to consider the impact of groups on individual behaviour, while observing the impact of individual personalities. The programme introduces theories and models relating to group work while the extent to which students already perceive themselves as managers is explored.

Principles of Marketing

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. We aim to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, giving them a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them. To start with, learning will be fairly directive - e.g. compulsory reading, and tutor led seminar discussion. Progressively students will be required to become more independent in their work by making their own reading selections and actively presenting during seminars. Students will also experience two different assessment types: individual essay writing and a group presentation. In addition to the course contents, this training will help students become better prepared for some of the other modules they take in the future.

Level 2

Buyer Behaviour and Market Research (Option)

This module prepares students for the use of market research techniques in order to help companies understand the nature of buyer behaviour activity. Students develop a critical perspective of how an understanding of buyer behaviour can be used by marketers to develop competitiveness. The module is also designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand and initiate customer market research activities.

Contemporary Issues for Business

This module explores a range of issues that emphasise the increasingly international business environment. These issues are underpinned by appropriate theory so that students can explain and analyse them using appropriate conceptual tools. For operational efficiency, the module is split into two elements. The first focuses on the international business environment and the second on domestic contemporary issues.

Critical HRM: Managing Diversity

This module engages critically with diversity and equality issues in contemporary organisations. Evaluation of current organisational strategies to promote and manage equality and diversity are key elements of this module. Critical examination of the role of 'social justice' and 'competitive business' are also incorporated. Social, ethical and philosophical dimensions of diversity in terms of gender, age, race, sexuality and disability will be explored, along with their practical implications.

Management Finance

(Option) The module includes revision in financial analysis, cash flow planning, budgets and variance analysis, finance and contemporary performance management. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting, management accounting and finance that inform and affect the manager. Furthermore, students thus have a platform in the principles, models and issues that underpin the advanced aspects of the subject area.

Marketing in Practice (Option)

(Option) This module considers the key influences on marketing, helping students to understand the issues involved in making marketing mix decisions, the relevance of competition to marketing decisions, the implementation of marketing in the organisation and selected applications of marketing. It is both theoretical and applied in nature, requiring students to use relevant concepts, models and frameworks both in the analysis of case material and when developing their own product concept. The module is broad-based covering many marketing topics and providing for the steady progression of students from certificate level through to the more demanding and strategic subject material of higher level marketing. Organisations rarely exist in a non-competitive vacuum therefore a key theme of the unit is the understanding and relevance of the concept of competitive advantage. This theme is developed throughout the unit by highlighting how marketing decisions at an operational level have a crucial part to play in delivering a unique and sustainable position for a company versus its competition. A second theme is the European flavour of the program which is developed throughout.

Operations Management A

This module responds to the need for students to understand the issues surrounding the management of resources and operations.

The module sets these issues in the context of:

  • Understanding organisations as 'systems' seeking to remain viable within their environments
  • The notion of 'operations management' as the act of aligning processes and systems to deliver an overall strategy and its marketing objectives, in both the service and the manufacturing environments.

Level 3

Business Project Management (Option)

(Option) Business project management is considered an important management philosophy for how organisations manage changing business environments. All projects have to be managed to a successful conclusion, which relies on complex and important decisions being made through phases of planning, monitoring and controlling. The module focuses on the issues of planning, organisational, procedural, systematic and financial management in order to create a project management structure for a modern business context.

Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management (Option)

This module provides an opportunity to draw on current research and professional practice into human resource management and development. The module introduces students to contemporary topics that are both practically and theoretically relevant. The topics/issues/research under consideration may vary year on year but at the heart of our concerns is a desire to draw upon Certificate and intermediate level study in order to consider the implications that contemporary human resource management and development theories hold for practitioners. In this context, the limitations of traditional approaches to human resource management practice will be explored and critiqued. Students will be required to apply their learning to emergent business issues, practices and challenges.

Crisis and Disaster Management (Option)

Events are not immune from disaster or crisis. This module explores the notion of risk and how this influences consumer behaviour and contemporary management practice. Through examination of a series of case studies, from organisations to places, it develops a critical understanding of risks, crises and disasters that can affect the events, tourism and sports industries. Students develop an understanding of contingency planning and crisis management practice in the 'experience' industries. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners enhances the students practical knowledge of the processes and procedures associated with crisis management.

Dissertation (Business) (Option)

(Option) The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. Students should demonstrate the ability to identify, organise and select from a large body of material in order to produce a coherent, well defined and internally consistent representation of their findings. Students work with their supervisor to research, develop and present their study for assessment following the agreed formats as prescribed by Lincoln Business School.

Economic Geography (Option)

This unit aims to equip students with an analytical framework with which they can interpret and explain spatial economic processes, structures and change at a regional and sub regional levels. This will enable students to identify the nature of spatial economics; a scale of analysis gaining increasing relevance in the context of International Economic integration.

Entrepreneurship and Venture Creation (Option)

(Option) The entrepreneurship route has been designed so that students are prepared to pursue careers as owner/managers and contemporary business managers, and understand the issues of modern entrepreneurial activities in contemporary environments. Students also examine the general principles of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activity, within a variety of settings.

European Business (Option)

(Option) The first part of the module aims to provide students with an understanding of the economic and political rationale for the European Union. The module then considers the development of key policies and themes as they affect business, for example, liberalisation, and industrial and enterprise policies for small, medium and large-scale enterprises. It also examines policies that have proved to be particularly controversial, such as social and labour market policy, EMU, as well as the current challenges arising from recent and future enlargements. Finally, the module examines the regional dimension of the European Union in the external context, including the challenges of competing in the global business environment and the role of the European Union as a key participant in international governance.

Financial Management for Business (Option)

Corporate Finance is a topic which uses theory and learning from accounting, economics, maths, politics and other social sciences. There is a certain level of complexity about this subject which stops it from being purely mechanistic, yet like other social sciences, it is subject to clear rules and relationships. However students soon realise that the interpretation and implementation of these rules will often vary due to random behaviour of individuals, combined with the breadth of judgement which is allowable under accounting regulations. Students are introduced to the tenets and assumptions of Corporate Finance. The conceptual arguments are explained and their practical application to the firm is demonstrated. It is assumed that students have covered level 2 Management Finance unit or its equivalent. Students ideally should have prior knowledge of reading and interpreting final accounts and should be familiar with GCSE level (or equivalent) Mathematical and Statistical concepts. The module is strongly focused on the ‘real-world’ application of every aspect of the theory; focusing in particular on companies listed on the London Stock Exchange.

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)

The main aim of this module is to assist you in becoming equipped with a range of skills which will enable you to think strategically in the context of this globalised business world. We consider the strategic marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. For many organisations, the importance of a global perspective and strategy is vital to long-term success. Competitive marketing strategy, examined in a global context, is a market oriented approach that establishes a profitable and sustainable position for the firm against all the forces that determine industry and ultimately international conditions of trading.

This module is about how organisations create and maintain a viable position in today’s complex business world. The unit seeks to examine the kind of thinking that can underpin successful marketing strategies and their practice. Successful marketing organisations are the ones which now and in the future will have the skills to manage multiple strategic processes. In the course of this module you will have full opportunity to examine and think about this multifaceted perspective on marketing.

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)

The major purpose of the unit is to appreciate the importance of the Human Resource function in an organisational context. The unit explores and examines strategic as well as operational aspects of the function in the light of the contemporary business environment besides the social and ethical context. The HRM practices e.g. recruitment and selection, appraisal, training, reward systems etc are examined within what constitutes as a ‘good practice’ and, more significantly, the issues of implementation are explored and addressed.

The unit will promote a critical level of thought and analysis which is essential to the consideration of the strategic role of the HR function and its organisational location. The unit will be taught by means of a lecture and will be supplemented by a seminar programme. The seminars will provide opportunity to critically discuss the lecture material and to engage in HR simulations in the areas of HR Planning, negotiation skills etc.

International Business (Option)

The study of international business relates to the operation of business organisations across national boundaries. In order to develop an understanding of international business this module examines how internationalisation has occurred principally through trade and investment. From both a theoretical and practical perspective the module investigates the international environment from the nature of international business, the international environment - from the role and function of international organisations to the international payments systems, in addition to the environmental forces faced by the international firm. In so doing it brings forward new issues, both internal and external, which impact on business activity.

Managing (Option)

This module adopts a praxis approach to managing, in the sense of on-going re-conceptualization of meanings experienced in the social realm. The complexity of the relationship between knowledge, theories and action is explored. Managing is regarded as not only a practical and pragmatic phenomenon but also as philosophical and sociological in kind. In this context, managing is viewed as problematic involving challenges, ambiguities and contradictions. From a Functional perspective, the activity of management is assumed to be an established historical, social and technical fact with a coherent set of theories and practices. In this module functionalist facts of managing are revealed as social constructs built upon underlying ideological beliefs about rationality and capitalism. The module sets out to identify and deconstruct these beliefs and practices and to provide students with analytical skills to better understand and respond to the challenges of managing.

Marketing Communications (Option)

Marketing Communications is one of the most noticeable and widely discussed instruments of the marketing mix and has an enormous impact on both society and the business world. Marketing Communications is of interest to everyone. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans. In a business environment where the price and quality of goods or service may be equally matched within a sector, what we say, how we say it and to whom - can make all the difference.

The module places marketing communications in context, then discusses the implications of buyer behaviour, how we learn, how we communicate and how we process the information we are bombarded with each day! We look at the implications for marketers trying to find a way through to their customers, be it the consumer or a business customer.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources. This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. It questions the benefits of schemes proposed by independent experts and critically appraises the plethora of financial products available in the financial services arena. The module focuses on both the process of financial planning and the logic and fundamental principles which drive it. It will provide a forum where students can identify trends and develop an understanding of the changing financial needs of the individual within modern society. It recognises that the secure world of private retirement pensions and state provision of health and social benefits is no longer the norm and suggests that individuals should see financial planning as a social discipline necessary for financial survival in future years. Consideration will be given to the law, and ethics and regulatory influences relating to the financial services industry will feature. The module will also examine in detail the practicalities of the UK Tax system on income and capital and examine ways in which exemptions and reliefs can be used to defer or minimise tax liabilities.

Strategic Management

Strategic management draws upon and integrates a range of business disciplines in examining both theory and practice. In so doing, it bridges the gap between discrete functionalist perspectives and the broader issues involved in general management activity. The module examines the overall challenges, issues and solutions, which are associated with the running of modern organisations.

Placements

THE PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE YEAR

All Lincoln Business School students studying a full-time degree are eligible to take the four year study option including a work placement year between the second and final year of study.

Students who complete a Professional Practice Year tend to achieve higher marks in their final year and a better overall degree grade on average. Many are offered jobs before they have even graduated.”

Our placement year, which we call the Professional Practice Year, has been recognised, by visiting companies offering placements, as significantly more encouraging, interactive and supportive than those offered by other, often much larger universities. The responsibility for applying for and securing a placement remains with the student, however we give you all the personal support you need to enable you to complete your search.

During level two you will be invited to attend a number of workshops and guest lectures around the topic of the Professional Practice Year, introducing the idea to you and assisting with the process of securing a placement that suits you. You can choose to do your placement in Lincoln, somewhere else in the local area, back at home, anywhere in the UK, and in fact anywhere in the world. The University of Lincoln does not charge a tuition fee for your placement year.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Facilities

Lincoln Business School is based in the David Chiddick building alongside Lincoln Law School.

The building was completely refurbished in 2010 and provides students with teaching and learning space including lecture theatres, workshop rooms, an IT/language lab and a mooting chamber, along with places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

The building provides high quality spaces for teaching and group learning and is the perfect setting for successful Business School students to learn and develop.

Career Opportunities

Graduates are sought after by employers across a wide range of business disciplines, including e-business, finance, human resource management, marketing and general management. Some go on to start their own businesses and are supported by the University’s enterprise service and incubation unit. Some graduates continue their studies at postgraduate level.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/studentcareersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

Introduction

Business studies combines elements of accountancy, finance, marketing, management and economics. Lincoln graduates achieve success in a diverse range of roles in the world of business and are highly sought after by employers.

While establishing a broad-based knowledge of how successful businesses operate, this course enables you to develop the critical-thinking, problem-solving and analytical skills you need to enter the competitive world of business.

Intellectually rigorous and industry focused, the BA (Hons) Business Studies programme explores a variety of topics, drawn broadly from the areas of statistics, economics, marketing, operations and strategy. Taking an international perspective, this degree prepares you for the global nature of modern business communications.

You have the opportunity to specialise in areas of particular interest, with niche modules that are often available only on specialist courses elsewhere. You can choose to take part in a 12-week or year-long industry placement scheme and there are many other chances to acquire workplace experience.

Our academics are active researchers and have real-world expertise. In addition, they engage with industry professionals throughout the course to ensure that you are exposed to current business thinking and develop the skills you need for a successful future career.

How You Study

Students are encouraged to develop independence in their thinking, and manage their own time with support from teaching staff.

Most modules include some lectures. These are designed to inspire and motivate students, introduce them to particular topics and give an overview of current issues and debates within the discipline. Some are given by visiting practitioners who provide 'live' case material and offer students industry contacts and careers advice.

In seminars, which typically involve numbers of fewer than 20, students are able to articulate their own thoughts and clarify ideas through discussion with others. A variety of learning methods are used including in-class group exercises, discussions, presentations, evaluation of sample material, and case study analysis.

Student participation is encouraged from the start and set as the norm for the rest of the course. Students are expected to prepare prescribed material for seminars as well as generally keep abreast of current developments in their discipline.

How You Are Assessed

A wide range of assessment strategies are used to reflect the student’s varying learning styles.

What We Look For In Your Application

Curiosity, energy, interest and commitment.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a minimum of 260 UCAS tariff points from at least two A Levels (or equivalent). In addition to the two A Levels, other qualifications such as AS Levels, the Extended Project and the ASDAN CoPE will be counted towards the 260 point requirement.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above, including English Language and Maths.

Applications are welcomed from mature students who are studying towards an Access to Higher Education programme. We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

Degree preparation courses for international students:

The University of Lincoln offers international students (non EU/UK) who do not meet the direct entry requirements for an undergraduate degree course the option of completing a degree preparation programme at the university’s International Study Centre. To find out more please visit www.lincoln.ac.uk/isc

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Analysis of Business Data

This introduces some quantitative techniques fundamental to the analysis of business data. It promotes a critical awareness and understanding of some of the processes, techniques and technology by which numerical information can be collected and communicated. Students practise the systematic use of appropriate industry-standard computer technology for the acquisition, analysis and presentation of data (for example, Excel or SPSS).

Contemporary Business Analysis

Students are introduced to a range of economic concepts and basic analytical techniques. Upon successful completion students are able to:

  • Explain the workings of the price mechanism, the labour market and various forms of market failure
  • Explain the relationship between the firm’s costs, revenues, prices and outputs within various market structures
  • Analyse the interaction between entrepreneur, the firm and its external environment
  • Analyse the inter-relationships between government and key macro-economic indicators
  • Understand the links between the internal and external economy and how this impacts on the firm and its external environment.

Financial Communications

Students develop an understanding of the relevance of finance and accounting and some of the current issues facing business people. It is not an introduction to the technical side of accounting, rather, non-specialists can gain the ability to understand and comment upon issues which will arise upon pursuing a business career. Most organisations spend considerable time and money producing 'Financial Communications' and the module examines the underlying reasons behind this behaviour and the extent to which these communications achieve their objectives.

Introduction to Business Law

This serves as an introduction to the English legal system and English contract law. The module is designed to give students a basic understanding of contract issues in England and will enable students to appreciate when a legally binding agreement comes into existence, the obligations involved and the consequences of breaking such agreements. Contract law underpins a company’s dealings with its customers, employees and suppliers. It is important that students appreciate the legal context in which everyday business decisions are made.

Organisational Behaviour 1: Evolving Perspectives of Management

(Option) It is suggested that organisational structure affects human behaviour in organisations and that strategy, structure and culture are closely related, although rarely considered together. To set contemporary management behaviour in context, an understanding of the evolution of management theory is necessary, together with a consideration of organisational structure. Accordingly, a number of competing and contrasting perspectives of past and present thinking on management are explored, together with an acknowledgement that some approaches are complementary, whilst others are in conflict and recognition that 'new' management thinking and methods may simply be repackaged familiar, old ideas. The term 'organisational behaviour' relates to the activities and interactions of people in organisations. Organisational behaviour has been defined as the 'inter-disciplinary body of knowledge and field of research, concerned with how formal organisations, behaviour of people within organisations and salient features of their context and environment, evolve and take shape, why all these things happen the way they do and what purposes they serve'. In considering the changing and evolving roles of management and managers, the module acknowledges that the study of organisational behaviour is multi-disciplinary and draws in particular from psychology, social psychology, sociology, economics and political science.

Organisational Behaviour 2: Management in Context

(Option) This module focuses on the impact of group dynamics on the individual, the impact of personality when working with others, and considers the impact of both group dynamics and personality on the workplace from a management perspective. The module seeks to consider the impact of groups on individual behaviour, while observing the impact of individual personalities. The programme introduces theories and models relating to group work while the extent to which students already perceive themselves as managers is explored.

Principles of Marketing

This module is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of marketing. We aim to familiarise students with the key concepts and issues of marketing, giving them a thorough grasp of the sort of marketing decisions there are to be made and what factors affect them. To start with, learning will be fairly directive - e.g. compulsory reading, and tutor led seminar discussion. Progressively students will be required to become more independent in their work by making their own reading selections and actively presenting during seminars. Students will also experience two different assessment types: individual essay writing and a group presentation. In addition to the course contents, this training will help students become better prepared for some of the other modules they take in the future.

Level 2

Buyer Behaviour and Market Research (Option)

This module prepares students for the use of market research techniques in order to help companies understand the nature of buyer behaviour activity. Students develop a critical perspective of how an understanding of buyer behaviour can be used by marketers to develop competitiveness. The module is also designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand and initiate customer market research activities.

Contemporary Issues for Business

This module explores a range of issues that emphasise the increasingly international business environment. These issues are underpinned by appropriate theory so that students can explain and analyse them using appropriate conceptual tools. For operational efficiency, the module is split into two elements. The first focuses on the international business environment and the second on domestic contemporary issues.

Critical HRM: Managing Diversity

This module engages critically with diversity and equality issues in contemporary organisations. Evaluation of current organisational strategies to promote and manage equality and diversity are key elements of this module. Critical examination of the role of 'social justice' and 'competitive business' are also incorporated. Social, ethical and philosophical dimensions of diversity in terms of gender, age, race, sexuality and disability will be explored, along with their practical implications.

Management Finance

(Option) The module includes revision in financial analysis, cash flow planning, budgets and variance analysis, finance and contemporary performance management. At its conclusion, students should have a solid understanding of the key elements of financial accounting, management accounting and finance that inform and affect the manager. Furthermore, students thus have a platform in the principles, models and issues that underpin the advanced aspects of the subject area.

Marketing in Practice (Option)

(Option) This module considers the key influences on marketing, helping students to understand the issues involved in making marketing mix decisions, the relevance of competition to marketing decisions, the implementation of marketing in the organisation and selected applications of marketing. It is both theoretical and applied in nature, requiring students to use relevant concepts, models and frameworks both in the analysis of case material and when developing their own product concept. The module is broad-based covering many marketing topics and providing for the steady progression of students from certificate level through to the more demanding and strategic subject material of higher level marketing. Organisations rarely exist in a non-competitive vacuum therefore a key theme of the unit is the understanding and relevance of the concept of competitive advantage. This theme is developed throughout the unit by highlighting how marketing decisions at an operational level have a crucial part to play in delivering a unique and sustainable position for a company versus its competition. A second theme is the European flavour of the program which is developed throughout.

Operations Management A

This module responds to the need for students to understand the issues surrounding the management of resources and operations.

The module sets these issues in the context of:

  • Understanding organisations as 'systems' seeking to remain viable within their environments
  • The notion of 'operations management' as the act of aligning processes and systems to deliver an overall strategy and its marketing objectives, in both the service and the manufacturing environments.

Level 3

Business Project Management (Option)

(Option) Business project management is considered an important management philosophy for how organisations manage changing business environments. All projects have to be managed to a successful conclusion, which relies on complex and important decisions being made through phases of planning, monitoring and controlling. The module focuses on the issues of planning, organisational, procedural, systematic and financial management in order to create a project management structure for a modern business context.

Contemporary Issues in Human Resource Management (Option)

This module provides an opportunity to draw on current research and professional practice into human resource management and development. The module introduces students to contemporary topics that are both practically and theoretically relevant. The topics/issues/research under consideration may vary year on year but at the heart of our concerns is a desire to draw upon Certificate and intermediate level study in order to consider the implications that contemporary human resource management and development theories hold for practitioners. In this context, the limitations of traditional approaches to human resource management practice will be explored and critiqued. Students will be required to apply their learning to emergent business issues, practices and challenges.

Crisis and Disaster Management (Option)

Events are not immune from disaster or crisis. This module explores the notion of risk and how this influences consumer behaviour and contemporary management practice. Through examination of a series of case studies, from organisations to places, it develops a critical understanding of risks, crises and disasters that can affect the events, tourism and sports industries. Students develop an understanding of contingency planning and crisis management practice in the 'experience' industries. The use of simulations and engagement with practitioners enhances the students practical knowledge of the processes and procedures associated with crisis management.

Dissertation (Business) (Option)

(Option) The dissertation is a major independent piece of work intended to develop a student’s ability to actively engage with core disciplinary issues. Students should demonstrate the ability to identify, organise and select from a large body of material in order to produce a coherent, well defined and internally consistent representation of their findings. Students work with their supervisor to research, develop and present their study for assessment following the agreed formats as prescribed by Lincoln Business School.

Economic Geography (Option)

This unit aims to equip students with an analytical framework with which they can interpret and explain spatial economic processes, structures and change at a regional and sub regional levels. This will enable students to identify the nature of spatial economics; a scale of analysis gaining increasing relevance in the context of International Economic integration.

Entrepreneurship and Venture Creation (Option)

(Option) The entrepreneurship route has been designed so that students are prepared to pursue careers as owner/managers and contemporary business managers, and understand the issues of modern entrepreneurial activities in contemporary environments. Students also examine the general principles of entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial activity, within a variety of settings.

European Business (Option)

(Option) The first part of the module aims to provide students with an understanding of the economic and political rationale for the European Union. The module then considers the development of key policies and themes as they affect business, for example, liberalisation, and industrial and enterprise policies for small, medium and large-scale enterprises. It also examines policies that have proved to be particularly controversial, such as social and labour market policy, EMU, as well as the current challenges arising from recent and future enlargements. Finally, the module examines the regional dimension of the European Union in the external context, including the challenges of competing in the global business environment and the role of the European Union as a key participant in international governance.

Financial Management for Business (Option)

Corporate Finance is a topic which uses theory and learning from accounting, economics, maths, politics and other social sciences. There is a certain level of complexity about this subject which stops it from being purely mechanistic, yet like other social sciences, it is subject to clear rules and relationships. However students soon realise that the interpretation and implementation of these rules will often vary due to random behaviour of individuals, combined with the breadth of judgement which is allowable under accounting regulations. Students are introduced to the tenets and assumptions of Corporate Finance. The conceptual arguments are explained and their practical application to the firm is demonstrated. It is assumed that students have covered level 2 Management Finance unit or its equivalent. Students ideally should have prior knowledge of reading and interpreting final accounts and should be familiar with GCSE level (or equivalent) Mathematical and Statistical concepts. The module is strongly focused on the ‘real-world’ application of every aspect of the theory; focusing in particular on companies listed on the London Stock Exchange.

Global Marketing Strategy (Option)

The modern world is made up of countries that are not separated from each other. For example countries trade different kind of goods from commodities to final products and many countries recognise the benefits of opening up their borders. This development of the international trade is also affecting businesses that must have a consistent strategy and global mind set in order to deal with the ever increasing number of organisations exporting, importing and manufacturing abroad.
This module considers the strategic and tactical marketing implications for companies operating in a rapidly changing and dynamic global business environment. The main aim of the module is to give you a range of skills which will enable you to think strategically in the context of this globalised business world
This module is about how organisations create and maintain a viable position in today’s complex business world. The unit seeks to examine the kind of thinking that can underpin successful marketing strategies and their practice. Successful marketing organisations are the ones which now and in the future will have the skills to manage multiple strategic processes. In the course of this module you will have full opportunity to examine and think about this multifaceted perspective on marketing.

Human Resource Management (Level 3) (Option)

The major purpose of the unit is to appreciate the importance of the Human Resource function in an organisational context. The unit explores and examines strategic as well as operational aspects of the function in the light of the contemporary business environment besides the social and ethical context. The HRM practices e.g. recruitment and selection, appraisal, training, reward systems etc are examined within what constitutes as a ‘good practice’ and, more significantly, the issues of implementation are explored and addressed.
Human Resource Management is increasingly seen as having a strategic role in today’s organisations; and hence, areas such as HR Strategy, the management of change and the development of organisational culture are also examined. Their impact on the process, practices and policies of HRM are analysed. Contemporary issues faced by the HR function are also considered. Managing the diverse workforce and issues faced by organisations in relation to business ethics and corporate social responsibility as well as the HR’s challenges in the international organisations of today will be discussed.
The unit will promote a critical level of thought and analysis which is essential to the consideration of the strategic role of the HR function and its organisational location. The unit will be taught by means of a lecture and will be supplemented by a seminar programme. The seminars will provide opportunity to critically discuss the lecture material and to engage in HR simulations in the areas of HR Planning, negotiation skills etc.

International Business (Option)

The study of international business relates to the operation of business organisations across national boundaries. In order to develop an understanding of international business this module examines how internationalisation has occurred principally through trade and investment. From both a theoretical and practical perspective the module investigates the international environment from the nature of international business, the international environment - from the role and function of international organisations to the international payments systems, in addition to the environmental forces faced by the international firm. In so doing it brings forward new issues, both internal and external, which impact on business activity.

Managing (Option)

This module adopts a praxis approach to managing, in the sense of on-going re-conceptualization of meanings experienced in the social realm. The complexity of the relationship between knowledge, theories and action is explored. Managing is regarded as not only a practical and pragmatic phenomenon but also as philosophical and sociological in kind. In this context, managing is viewed as problematic involving challenges, ambiguities and contradictions. From a Functional perspective, the activity of management is assumed to be an established historical, social and technical fact with a coherent set of theories and practices. In this module functionalist facts of managing are revealed as social constructs built upon underlying ideological beliefs about rationality and capitalism. The module sets out to identify and deconstruct these beliefs and practices and to provide students with analytical skills to better understand and respond to the challenges of managing.

Marketing Communications (Option)

Marketing Communications is one of the most noticeable and widely discussed instruments of the marketing mix and has an enormous impact on both society and the business world. Every private consumer is exposed to advertising and takes advantage of sales promotions, buys famous brands and visits stores. Organisations make every effort to influence the buying behaviour of consumers and are equally motivated to communicate effectively with their business customers and suppliers. In a business environment where the price and quality of goods and services may be equally matched within a sector, what organisations say, how they say it and to whom can make all the difference. Marketing Communications is of interest to everyone. Theories of information processing and buyer behaviour, both at individual and organisational level, are explored and applied in the development of communication plans.

Marketing executives face the challenge of integrating the strengths of the various promotional tools to build successful brands and to achieve competitive advantage. In a business environment where the price and quality of goods or service may be equally matched within a sector, what we say, how we say it and to whom - can make all the difference. Marketing communications is of interest to everyone…

The module places marketing communications in context, then discusses the implications of buyer behaviour, how we learn, how we communicate and how we process the information we are bombarded with each day! We look at the implications for marketers trying to find a way through to their customers, be it the consumer or a business customer.

Personal Financial Planning (Option)

Personal financial planning is the process whereby individuals can determine whether or not they can meet their financial objectives through proper management of their financial resources. This module demonstrates and explores the application of a range of techniques used to help achieve this aim. It questions the benefits of schemes proposed by independent experts and critically appraises the plethora of financial products available in the financial services arena. The module focuses on both the process of financial planning and the logic and fundamental principles which drive it. It will provide a forum where students can identify trends and develop an understanding of the changing financial needs of the individual within modern society. It recognises that the secure world of private retirement pensions and state provision of health and social benefits is no longer the norm and suggests that individuals should see financial planning as a social discipline necessary for financial survival in future years. Consideration will be given to the law, and ethics and regulatory influences relating to the financial services industry will feature. The module will also examine in detail the practicalities of the UK Tax system on income and capital and examine ways in which exemptions and reliefs can be used to defer or minimise tax liabilities.

Strategic Management

Strategic management draws upon and integrates a range of business disciplines in examining both theory and practice. In so doing, it bridges the gap between discrete functionalist perspectives and the broader issues involved in general management activity. The module examines the overall challenges, issues and solutions, which are associated with the running of modern organisations.

Special Features & Research Highlights

Entrepreneurialism

With a nomination for Entrepreneurial University of the Year in The Times Higher Education Awards 2013, the University of Lincoln is extremely proud of its approach to nurturing and mentoring entrepreneurialism in its students. It has its own business incubation centre, Sparkhouse, which offers a variety of services to students and graduates launching their own business, including office accommodation, mentoring and business planning. More than 200 start-up businesses have been supported by Sparkhouse.

Placements

All Lincoln Business School students have the option to complete a work placement year, during which you can undertake a paid full-time role in an industry of your choosing in the UK or overseas. A placement year exposes you to a professional business environment, offering valuable workplace experience, networking and knowledge. Many students who complete a work placement year receive a job offer before they graduate.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Facilities

Lincoln Business School is based in the recently refurbished David Chiddick building, which provides students with teaching and learning spaces, including lecture theatres, workshop rooms and IT labs, as well as places to meet and eat with friends and staff.

Career Opportunities

Our Business Studies graduates are desirable to employers because of the breadth and depth of their knowledge. They go on to work in e-commerce, financial management, human resources and marketing. Many successfully launch their own businesses.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/studentcareersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

Fees

2014 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £11,798 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point £98 per credit point
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2015 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £12,084 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point £101 per credit point
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/internationalscholarships/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages. Occasionally provision may be altered in order to meet changing circumstances or to keep courses up to date with trends and developments in subject areas. Specific programme queries should be directed to the teaching department. Fees for all our courses may increase each year in line with government regulations and are subject to change.


Always check our website for the latest information about entry tariffs, fees & funding before making your application to the University.