Course Information

MComp Games Computing

MComp Games Computing

MComp 3 - 5 Years School of Computer Science Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 320 points G610 MComp 3 - 5 Years School of Computer Science Lincoln Campus [L] Validated 320 points G610

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Accreditations

Accreditations

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Overseas Applicants


For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One learning experience. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.


Further information about the International Year One

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Clearing 2014

This course is available for 2014 entry.
Call the Clearing Hotline on 01522 886622.

Graduate's Industry Success

Games Computing graduate, David King, is Technical Director for Criterion Games, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Electronic Arts. He has worked as a Tools Engineer on titles such as the Need for Speed and Harry Potter franchises.

Introduction

The MComp is a four-year programme which enhances and extends the equivalent BSc (Hons) programme. It includes an industry-related project, some optional study modules and a substantial Masters level project. Taking a fourth year of study allows you to study at Masters Level and both deepen and broaden your knowledge and understanding. This can provide you with a stronger CV and give you a distinct edge in the job market.

An emphasis is placed on game programming, mathematics, graphics and game engine programming, game design and other specialist areas such as artificial intelligence and computer vision during this degree.

The curriculum is closely matched to industry standards and trends. As well as specialising in computer game development, you will gain a thorough grounding in all aspects of software development and computer project management.

For those who wish to continue their academic studies, the degree offers a sound basis for research and study at doctoral level.

MComp Games Computing specifically aims to develop professional and transferable skills in the selection and deployment of a range of methods, techniques and practices appropriate for a games computing professional.

The course is distinctive in that it provides strong conceptual and methodological groundings in game software design and development, as well as the contemporary approaches to more general software development.

In particular, the Games Computing curriculum gives students exposure to, and the opportunity to develop skills in, core areas of game development. Students are encouraged to develop their own creativity and advanced computing skills, and to recognise that software engineering methodologies and principles are as important as creative design in the success of a computer game product.

Mathematics and programming activities give a firm base on which to develop these principles. Opportunities to develop software within computer games console environments, such as the Xbox 360 as well as within desktop and mobile environments, are designed to encourage students to further demonstrate their skills.

Accreditations

This course is accredited by the following:

  • The British Computer Society
  • Institution of Analysts and Programmers
  • British Interactive Multimedia Association (BIMA)
  • International Game Developers Association (IGDA).

How You Study

Full-time or part-time study available

How You Are Assessed

The course is assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework and examinations, although the majority of assessments are coursework based.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a minimum of 320 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of two A Levels (or the equivalent). In addition to the minimum of two A Levels, other qualifications such as AS Levels, the Extended Project and the ASDAN CoPE for example, will be counted towards the 320 point requirement.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English Language and Maths.

Applications are welcomed from mature students who are studying towards an Access to Higher Education programme. A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required. We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One in Computer Science. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Algorithms and Complexity

The module introduces the concepts of Algorithms and Complexity, providing an understanding of the range of applications where algorithmic solutions are required. Students will be introduced to the analysis of time and space efficiency of algorithms; to the key issues in algorithm design; to the range of techniques used in the design of various types of algorithms. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around algorithms and complexity in the lectures, together with a practical experience of implementing a range of algorithms in the workshops.

Computer Architectures

This module introduces the fundamentals of computer hardware underpinning the key aspects of Computer Science. This knowledge is not only essential for deeper understanding of the governing processes behind computing but also for realising how hardware interacts with software. By studying Computer Architecture, students will gain greater confidence in their study subject and future benefits when improving their programming skills. The module will study the individual components of a computer system, their function, main characteristics, performance and their mutual interaction. Examples of the practical application of the skills developed in this module are given utilising a range of computing applications, including but not restricted to the domains of Games and Social Computing applications.

Game Design 1

This module explores games as products of a design process, centred on how the mechanics of a game shape the experience of the players.
There is a strong focus on practical work and experimentation, to get a first-hand understanding of how the components of a game work together and the effects of various changes in context.
Concepts such as design patterns, gameplay, game mechanics, storyline, narrative, game architecture, randomness and game balance are all studied, using examples of card games, board games and computer games from both contemporary and traditional sources.
The module will be broadly split between game design theory and game design practice. Level design (as an example of experience design in general) and its practical application via a commercial game development environment will be practically explored in detail. Theories of game design and design patterns will be studied using hands-on exercises such as paper prototyping and board game mock-ups as examples.

Introductory Games Studies

This module provides students with an introduction to the study, design ,and development of computer games. The module provides a grounding and context for the Games Computing programme, encompassing the history of games technology and development of the industry, as well as societal, cultural and ethical aspects. Students will gain an appreciation of the production processes and analytical/technical skills required to work in industry. They will also do some introductory development work during workshop sessions, set against a series of design challenges, using appropriate development tools.

Maths for Computing

This module aims to equip students with mathematical knowledge and skills required to design and develop computer systems and software.

Programming and Data Structures

This module introduces the concepts and practice of simple computer programming, with attention paid to the fundamentals that constitute a complete computer program including layout, structure and functionality. The module extends students' knowledge of computer programming and introduces them to fundamental computing data structures allowing the representation of data in computer programs.

Web Authoring

This module provides students with the knowledge to design and implement interactive client-side web technologies. Students will learn key concepts in web markup languages; notably the features and capabilities that are part of the HTML5 specification standard including multimedia elements, the canvas element, and local web storage. Additionally students will be able to identify and develop technologies that are part of the wider HTML5 family such as CSS3, geolocation, drag and drop, and javascript. A standards driven approach will be adopted throughout the module using web page validation techniques, with emphasis on the importance of separating web page style and structure.

Level 2

Artificial Intelligence

This module provides a comprehensive introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and highlights application areas of AI, ranging from computer games to robotics. The module first considers the symbolic model of intelligence, exploring some of the main conceptual issues, theoretical approaches and practical techniques. The module further explores knowledge-based systems such as expert systems, which mimic human reasoning performance by capturing knowledge of a domain and integrating it to deliver a performance comparable to that of a human practitioner. Fundamental techniques such as heuristic search and its application to planning are being taught, facilitating problem solving and games AI. To complement the symbolic and deterministic approaches in AI, an introduction to probabilistic reasoning and decision making is given. The learning of the relevant theoretical concepts is facilitated through practical workshops throughout the semester comprising of hands-on implementation and application of AI algorithms. The module discusses the opportunities and limitations of state-of-the-art AI techniques and their potential in solving real-world problems, with references to recent research.

Game Design 2

This module builds on previous study to explore the application of game design in commercial game development.

The tools and methodologies of commercial game design are introduced and exercised in appropriate contexts. This includes pitching, requirements gathering, documentation of game design and gameplay evaluation.

There is a broad focus on applications of game design, identifying special considerations and requirements, including in the context of video games, board games, role-playing games, war games, simulation and sports.

Students will be encouraged to critique both their own designs and others. Frequent constructive group critiques will give students feedback on their design and ideas.

Games Programming

This module introduces the students to the fundamentals, theory, and techniques of Games Programming. The module gives the student a grounding in the development of games for predominantly, but not limited to, console systems.

Consideration of games programming algorithms and techniques is given, whilst ensuring the student understands not only the programming aspect of games development but also the interaction techniques and devices and how sound and control interfaces make up a game.

Students will be encouraged to develop game code that draws on 2D and 3D graphic representation and graphics algorithms and techniques to deliver a complete game.

Graphics

This module introduces the student to the fundamentals, theory, principles, methods, and techniques of 2D and 3D Computer Graphics (CG) and Computer Generated Imagery (CGI). The specialised mathematical underpinnings are explored along with their practical application in algorithms. The development of skills in implementing and developing computer graphic applications with C/C++ and standard graphics libraries (such as OpenGL) encourages the student to develop their programming skills while observing the theory of 3D graphics in practice. The above will be delivered through a games programming context. Students will be encouraged to develop interactive 3D Graphics application, utilising the graphics algorithms and techniques.
This module develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques: coordinate systems, transformations (translation, rotation, and scaling), projection, vector additions and multiplications, matrix operations, dot and cross products, parametric curves and surfaces, viewing conventions.

Group Project

This module aims to provide students with the experience of working as part of a team on a development project. Students will produce a set of deliverables relevant to their programme of study, including a finished product or artefact. Final deliverables will be negotiated between the group and their supervisor, the module coordinator will be responsible for ensuring that each project covers the learning outcomes of the module. Groups are expected to manage their own processes, and to hold regular meetings both with and without their supervisor. Groups will be allocated by the module coordinator and other members of staff. The process of development of the artefact and the interaction and management of group members underpins the assessment of skills in the module.

Object-Oriented Programming

This module provides a comprehensive analysis of the general principles and practices of advanced programming with respect to software development. Notions and techniques of advanced programming are emphasised in the context of analysis, design and implementation of software and algorithms. Great importance is placed upon the Object-Oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development.

Professional Practice

Professional Practice aims to develop an understanding of the basic cultural, social, legal, and ethical issues inherent in the discipline of computing; and to promote personal professionalism in the workplace. Examples of topics covered include:

  • The special nature of technological ethics.
  • Ethical decision-making and case analysis.
  • Ethics of software development.
  • Legal issues in the field of technology.
  • Codes of computer ethics and professional practice.
  • Globalisation of professionalism.
  • Professional engagement with the job applications process.
  • Information security
  • Risk assessment
  • Safety aspects

Level 3

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)

The module introduces the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.

Business Intelligence (Option)

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to technologies, applications, and practices for the collection, integration, analysis, and presentation of meaningful and useful information for business purposes. The purpose of the module is to understand the issues involved in the use and application of these ‘tools’ and how BI might be applied to generate creative and novel insight helping support better business decisions. BI systems are data-driven Decision Support Systems. They provide historical, current, predictive and insightful views of business operations, most often using data gathered from data warehouses. Software elements support reporting, interactive 'slice-and-dice' pivot-table analyses, visualization, and statistical data mining.

Critical Perspectives on Project Management (Option)

The module Critical Perspectives on Project Management explores the practical issues and challenges of putting technology to work. As technology grows and becomes ever more pervasive, the size, complexity and timescales of related projects grow too. The challenges facing project managers involved in planning, coordinating, directing and implementing technology based projects on-time, to budget and operationally as expected is ever growing. This module develops a critical perspective of project management and uses case based material to develop an understanding about the various challenges project management in this arena presents. Students are encouraged to reflect on the limits of certain forms of rational project management modes in conditions that are more accurately described in terms of uncertainty, complexity, risk and chaos.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 1 (Option)

This module provides the business context for activities supported by and delivered through computing technologies. Students investigate the drivers for modern Electronic Business and consider enterprise applications from a business viewpoint. Students will explore the process of taking a technologically grounded idea, and develop a business case through break-even point to where profitability begins and specify an appropriate web site as the vehicle to deliver the business case. The Entrepreneurial perspective considers business development as a holistic process, students will engage with this notion throughout the module. The module will also draw upon examples and themes from social computing, the importance of which is growing rapidly in importance.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 2 (Option)

This module builds on the principles of Entrepreneurship & Innovation I and applies formalised methods and approaches in the exploration of specific areas of entrepreneurship and innovation. The module will also investigate the application of social computing principles, game theory and cooperation analysis in the development of an entrepreneurial idea.

Game Engine Architectures

The term 'Game Engine' is widely used to describe the core software used to create a computer game, which typically combines key modules of functionality including graphics rendering, audio, player interface, physics simulation, non-player character control, and multiplayer game code. Students will have already studied some of these component functionalities in previous modules.

In this module, students will study advanced topics related to the development, structure, design, and use of professional-standard game engine software. This will primarily focus on technical aspects, including algorithms and optimisation, as well as software engineering issues such as code interface design, and cross-platform support. Previously studied topics, such as rendering, user interfaces, and AI will be revisited within this context. Students will look at various examples of open-source and commercial engines, and undertake practical work in lab sessions which will include analysis and modification of existing game engines.

Image Processing (Option)

Digital image processing techniques are used in a wide variety of application areas such as computer vision, robotics, remote sensing, industrial inspection, medical imaging, etc. It is the study of any algorithms that take image as an input and returns useful information as output. This module aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of image processing, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply and combine techniques to various image-related applications. The students will be able to extract useful data from the raw image and interpret the image data. The techniques will be implemented using the mathematical programming language Matlab or OpenCV.

Mobile Computing (Option)

This module provides students with knowledge in the design, development, and evaluation of cloud-connected mobile applications using industry standard tools and guidelines. Mobile device platforms – smartphones - provide a rich development experience with direct access to a number of pervasive sensors such as GPS, camera, proximity, NFC and multiple network connectivity channels. These sensors are used as building blocks for lifestyle-supporting mobile applications in areas such as health, fitness, social, science, and entertainment. Such applications are now seen as part of the everyday fabric of life. Students will learn how to develop topically-themed mobile applications that consume cloud-connected web services. Data privacy and security issues are discussed throughout the module. Access to smartphone technologies globally, feature phone vs. smartphone comparison and users of such devices, access constraints to data and other services - such as local government and banking.

Parallel Computing (Option)

Parallel Computing is a very important, modern paradigm in Computer Science, which is a promising direction for keeping up with the expected exponential growth in the discipline. Executing multiple processes at the same time can tremendously increase the computational throughput not only benefitting scientific computations but also leading to new exciting applications like real-time animated 3d graphics, video processing, physics simulation, etc. The relevance of parallel computing is especially prominent due to availability of modern, affordable computer hardware utilising multi-core and/or large number of massively parallel units.

Physics Simulation

Realistic physics simulation is a key component for many modern technologies including computer games, video animation, medical imaging, robotics, etc. This wide range of applications benefiting from real-time physics simulation is a result of recent advances in developing new efficient simulation techniques and the common availability of powerful hardware. The main application area considered in this module is computer games, but the taught content has much wider relevance and can be applied to other areas of Computer Science.

Software Engineering (Option)

The module covers advanced topics of Software Engineering, focusing on software methodologies, with respect to changes in the software development process including past and present techniques. Key Software Engineering principles are explored in the context of real world software engineering challenges such as software evolution and reuse. Topics such as advanced testing, verification and validation, critical systems development, re-factoring and design patterns will be covered.

Masters Level

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)

This module covers the theoretical fundamentals and practical applications of decision-making, problem-solving and learning abilities in software agents. Search is introduced as a unifying framework for Artificial Intelligence (AI), followed by key topics including blind and informed search algorithms, planning and reasoning, both with certain and uncertain (e.g. probabilistic) knowledge. Practical exercises in AI programming will complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems.

Advanced Programming (Option)

This module will explore advanced topics using a contemporary object-oriented programming language. The objective is to prepare students for professional-level programming in scientific and commercial computing, and to support programming tasks in other modules of this award.
Students will explore a range of programming topics through a series of lectures and practical workshops, and will work on producing an individual programming assignment.

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)

This module provides students with advanced concepts of Software Engineering principles and practices. Students will explore up-to-date methodologies and their application to real-world products and services will be covered.

Indicative topics of study will include (but are not limited to):
• Agile methods of software engineering;
• Requirements engineering, design, software components, software reuse, verification and validation, maintenance and configuration management, software evolution;
• Critical system development and the ethical implications of software engineering;
• Fault Tree Analysis.

Computer Vision (Option)

This module will explore current methodologies in the field of computer vision, covering a range of aspects in capturing, processing, analysing and interpreting rich visual content. The aim is to offer students with a deep understanding and to allow an exposure to the latest developments in computer vision, equipping them with knowledge in practical depth. The module will also provide training in programming skills (e.g. Matlab), tools and methods that are necessary for the implementation of computer vision systems.
The module will also cover applications of computer vision in various fields, such as in object recognition/tracking, medical image analysis, multimedia indexing and retrieval and intelligent surveillance systems, allowing the students to establish a full awareness to the technology advance in this rapidly evolving field

Machine Learning (Option)

This module covers the theoretical fundamentals and practical application of machine learning algorithms, including supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement and evolutionary learning. Practical programming exercises complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems such as data mining.

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)

This module explores the cutting-edge computing concepts and in-the-field deployment of emerging Internet of Things (IoT) platforms and devices. The module will investigate, through practical implementation, the low-barrier capture, communication, and highly scalable consumption of data from geographically dispersed physical objects and sensors, with a view to creating novel end-user experiences. Physical objects can now be easily connected to the internet and other objects through small, low-power, and inexpensive lightweight computing devices; creating hugely scalable networks of ‘things’ that can interoperate and stream data using simple web standards such as REST. IoT enabled objects and infrastructure can enable unforeseen opportunities for novel application scenarios, data collection and consumption, as well as create new markets around open data and third party applications. Additionally, the module will cover how emerging capability such as locative and context aware technology can be exploited in cloud-connected prototypes and mobile applications. In terms of practical development, special attention is given to: creating data stream assets from sensor boards and smartphones, building a cloud information hub to store sensor data, and developing cloud services for consumption by mobile and other third party applications. Students will be asked to design and prototype IoT enabled applications, based on themed societal issues, using a combination of development boards and sensors, cloud computing services, and mobile applications.

Level 4

Advanced Graphics

This module enhances students understanding of concepts and theory around computer graphics, as well as enhancing their practical techniques. Advanced techniques available for graphics processing units (GPUs) are exploring along with their practical implementation.

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (M) (Option)

The module introduces the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Business Intelligence (M) (Option)

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to technologies, applications, and practices for the collection, integration, analysis, and presentation of meaningful and useful information for business purposes. The purpose of the module is to understand the issues involved in the use and application of these ‘tools’ and how BI might be applied to generate creative and novel insight helping support better business decisions. BI systems are data-driven Decision Support Systems. They provide historical, current, predictive and insightful views of business operations, most often using data gathered from data warehouses. Software elements support reporting, interactive 'slice-and-dice' pivot-table analyses, visualization, and statistical data mining.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Critical Perspectives on Project Management (M) (Option)

The module Critical Perspectives on Project Management explores the practical issues and challenges of putting technology to work. As technology grows and becomes ever more pervasive, the size, complexity and timescales of related projects grow too. The challenges facing project managers involved in planning, coordinating, directing and implementing technology based projects on-time, to budget and operationally as expected is ever growing. This module develops a critical perspective of project management and uses case based material to develop an understanding about the various challenges project management in this arena presents. Students are encouraged to reflect on the limits of certain forms of rational project management modes in conditions that are more accurately described in terms of uncertainty, complexity, risk and chaos.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Data Analytics and Visualisation (Option)

This module develops students’ understanding of contemporary approaches to data analysis and visualisation. The module places particular emphasis on making sense of large datasets such as those generated from social media interactions or other web sources. It delivers material on the fundamental understanding of human visual perception and the political and persuasive power of data, and develops this alongside the use of standard tools for data collection, processing, manipulation, analysis and visual presentation. The practical role of data analytics and visualisation in media and business contexts is a core thread running through the module.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 1 (M) (Option)

In this module students investigate the drivers for modern Electronic Business and consider enterprise applications from a business viewpoint. Students will explore the process of taking a technologically grounded idea and develop a business case to the point where profitability begins. Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

MComp Research Project

The MComp Research Project is an individual piece of work that requires students to apply and integrate theoretical knowledge and practical skills from the breadth of their experience with computer science sub-disciplines, in order to address a specific research question or questions formulated with support from academic staff.

The form and nature of this project is negotiable, but at MComp Level 4 there are typically three types of Project that are undertaken:

  • Industrial Based Project work (typically engaged with through a work placement)
  • Client-based project delivery (typically with an approved client in either public, private or third sector partners, and with a clearly articulated delivery)
  • A research based project (typically done in conjunction with a member of academic staff in the School and with a clear linkage to research activity of the staff member but which could include collaborative projects with research groups at other Universities)

The student will undertake work that is predominantly relevant to the ongoing research in one of the established research centres within the School of Computer Science. In all cases the Project supervisor will ensure that the study undertaken is suitably grounded within the programme title of each student.

Movement Interfaces

Recent years have seen growing interest in games interfaces that require movement of the body, and build on the user’s physical skills and abilities; the new dimension introduces a unique set of challenges in the design of games that extends beyond traditional human-computer interaction. This module provides students with advanced understanding of theoretical and practical concerns related to the design of technology that recognizes, captures and visualizes player movement. A number of inter-disciplinary perspectives on designing for player movement are considered, such as accessibility of games for players with mobility impairments, sports, performance, dance and audience. In addition, students will engage with practical issues related to the design, development and evaluation of movement-based games.

Software Engineering (M) (Option)

The module covers advanced topics of Software Engineering, focusing on software methodologies, with respect to changes in the software development process including past and present techniques. Key Software Engineering principles are explored in the context of real world software engineering challenges such as software evolution and reuse. Topics including advanced testing, verification and validation, critical systems development, re-factoring and design patterns will be covered.
Current research in Software Engineering will be discussed with the expectation of researching recent software engineering concepts. Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Special Features & Research Highlights

Students have access to specialised development laboratory provision providing access to industry standard software development environments, 3D modelling software and game distribution platforms, such as the Steam Café.

In addition, console development environments are provided such as Xbox 360 systems and PlayStation 2 Linux development kits. A motion capture research system is available for project work.

Overseas study visits have been a feature of our courses in recent years. Visits to locations within the United States provide students with a unique insight into games development issues in overseas territories.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Career Opportunities

Graduates go on to work as game, tools and physics/AI programmers, level designers, mission scripters, games testers, web designers and IT project managers.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

Introduction

The MComp is a four-year programme which enhances and extends the equivalent BSc (Hons) programme. It includes an industry-related project, some optional study modules and a substantial Masters level project. Taking a fourth year of study allows you to study at Masters Level and both deepen and broaden your knowledge and understanding. This can provide you with a stronger CV and give you a distinct edge in the job market.

The global video games industry is worth more than $80 billion annually. It has, in terms of sales, overtaken the film industry. New released of games and consoles are no longer just product launches but international news events.

Games Computing degrees at the University of Lincoln are closely aligned with industry practice and trends to ensure that you are prepared for a successful career in this evolving and innovative sector.

Our Games Computing courses are distinctive in that they provide a strong conceptual and methodological grounding in games design and development, as well as a contemporary approach to more general software development and computer science. Throughout the course, you are encouraged to recognise that software engineering is as important as creative design in the success of computer games products.

You develop software within console environments, as well as in desktop and mobile platforms. The course also explores games programming, mathematics, games engine programming and other specialist topics such as artificial intelligence and social gaming.

Accreditations

This course is accredited by the following:

  • The British Computer Society
  • Institution of Analysts and Programmers
  • British Interactive Multimedia Association (BIMA)
  • International Game Developers Association (IGDA).

How You Study

Full-time or part-time study available.

In your first year, you study fundamental areas of software development, including computer systems, mathematics for computing, operating systems and games design. In your second year, there is in-depth study of areas of games computing, such as computer graphics, games programming and design, human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence. You complete an independent project in your third year and you can choose from a range of specialist optional modules, including computer vision, robotics and mobile platform development.

In fourth year you gain a more in-depth knowledge of games computing, engaging in a number of hands-on, specialist projects which provide you with the opportunity to work with our world-class research staff and industry clients.

How You Are Assessed

The course is assessed through a variety of means, including in-class tests, coursework and examinations, although the majority of assessments are coursework based.

Entry Requirements

Applicants should have a minimum of 320 UCAS Tariff points from a minimum of two A Levels (or the equivalent). In addition to the minimum of two A Levels, other qualifications such as AS Levels, the Extended Project and the ASDAN CoPE for example, will be counted towards the 320 point requirement.

We also accept a wide range of other qualifications including the BTEC Extended Diploma, Diploma and Subsidiary Diploma, the European and International Baccalaureate Diplomas, and Advanced Diplomas. You can find tariff values on the UCAS website http://lncn.eu/cdez

Applicants will also be required to have at least five GCSEs at grade C or above (or the equivalent), including English Language and Maths.

Applications are welcomed from mature students who are studying towards an Access to Higher Education programme. A minimum of 45 level 3 credits at merit or above will be required. We will also consider applicants with extensive relevant work experience.

For international students who do not meet criteria for direct entry to this degree we offer the International Year One in Computer Science. Depending on your English language level you will study 3 or 4 terms then progress directly to the second year of this degree.

If you would like further information about entry requirements, or would like to discuss whether the qualifications you are currently studying are acceptable, please contact the Admissions team on 01522 886097, or email admissions@lincoln.ac.uk.

Level 1

Algorithms and Complexity

The module introduces the concepts of Algorithms and Complexity, providing an understanding of the range of applications where algorithmic solutions are required. Students will be introduced to the analysis of time and space efficiency of algorithms; to the key issues in algorithm design; to the range of techniques used in the design of various types of algorithms. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around algorithms and complexity in the lectures, together with a practical experience of implementing a range of algorithms in the workshops.

Computer Architectures

This module introduces the fundamentals of computer hardware underpinning the key aspects of Computer Science. This knowledge is not only essential for deeper understanding of the governing processes behind computing but also for realising how hardware interacts with software. By studying Computer Architecture, students will gain greater confidence in their study subject and future benefits when improving their programming skills. The module will study the individual components of a computer system, their function, main characteristics, performance and their mutual interaction. Examples of the practical application of the skills developed in this module are given utilising a range of computing applications, including but not restricted to the domains of Games and Social Computing applications.

Game Design 1

This module explores games as products of a design process, centred on how the mechanics of a game shape the experience of the players.
There is a strong focus on practical work and experimentation, to get a first-hand understanding of how the components of a game work together and the effects of various changes in context.
Concepts such as design patterns, gameplay, game mechanics, storyline, narrative, game architecture, randomness and game balance are all studied, using examples of card games, board games and computer games from both contemporary and traditional sources.
The module will be broadly split between game design theory and game design practice. Level design (as an example of experience design in general) and its practical application via a commercial game development environment will be practically explored in detail. Theories of game design and design patterns will be studied using hands-on exercises such as paper prototyping and board game mock-ups as examples.

Introductory Games Studies

This module provides students with an introduction to the study, design ,and development of computer games. The module provides a grounding and context for the Games Computing programme, encompassing the history of games technology and development of the industry, as well as societal, cultural and ethical aspects. Students will gain an appreciation of the production processes and analytical/technical skills required to work in industry. They will also do some introductory development work during workshop sessions, set against a series of design challenges, using appropriate development tools.

Maths for Computing

This module aims to equip students with mathematical knowledge and skills required to design and develop computer systems and software. Topics covered include: sets, relations and functions, logic, basic calculus, algebra, basic statistics, introduction to probability theory.

Programming and Data Structures

This module introduces the concepts and practice of simple computer programming, with attention paid to the fundamentals that constitute a complete computer program including layout, structure and functionality. The module extends students' knowledge of computer programming and introduces them to fundamental computing data structures allowing the representation of data in computer programs.

Web Authoring

This module provides students with the knowledge to design and implement interactive client-side web technologies. Students will learn key concepts in web markup languages; notably the features and capabilities that are part of the HTML5 specification standard including multimedia elements, the canvas element, and local web storage. Additionally students will be able to identify and develop technologies that are part of the wider HTML5 family such as CSS3, geolocation, drag and drop, and javascript. A standards driven approach will be adopted throughout the module using web page validation techniques, with emphasis on the importance of separating web page style and structure.

Level 2

Artificial Intelligence

This module provides a basic introduction to the field of Artificial Intelligence (AI). The module first considers the symbolic model of intelligence, exploring some of the main conceptual issues, theoretical approaches and practical techniques. The module further explores knowledge-based systems such as expert systems, which mimic human reasoning performance by capturing knowledge of a domain and integrating it to deliver a performance comparable to that of a human practitioner. Modern developments such as artificial neural networks and uncertain reasoning are also covered using probability theory, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply AI techniques in practice using logic programming.

Game Design 2

This module builds on previous study to explore the application of game design in commercial game development.

The tools and methodologies of commercial game design are introduced and exercised in appropriate contexts. This includes pitching, requirements gathering, documentation of game design and gameplay evaluation.

There is a broad focus on applications of game design, identifying special considerations and requirements, including in the context of video games, board games, role-playing games, war games, simulation and sports.

Students will be encouraged to critique both their own designs and others. Frequent constructive group critiques will give students feedback on their design and ideas.

Games Programming

This module introduces the students to the fundamentals, theory, and techniques of Games Programming. The module gives the student a grounding in the development of games for predominantly, but not limited to, console systems.

Consideration of games programming algorithms and techniques is given, whilst ensuring the student understands not only the programming aspect of games development but also the interaction techniques and devices and how sound and control interfaces make up a game.

Students will be encouraged to develop game code that draws on 2D and 3D graphic representation and graphics algorithms and techniques to deliver a complete game.

Graphics

This module introduces the student to the fundamentals, theory, principles, methods, and techniques of 2D and 3D Computer Graphics (CG) and Computer Generated Imagery (CGI). The specialised mathematical underpinnings are explored along with their practical application in algorithms. The development of skills in implementing and developing computer graphic applications with C/C++ and standard graphics libraries (such as OpenGL) encourages the student to develop their programming skills while observing the theory of 3D graphics in practice. The above will be delivered through a games programming context. Students will be encouraged to develop interactive 3D Graphics application, utilising the graphics algorithms and techniques.
This module develops the following mathematical concepts and techniques: coordinate systems, transformations (translation, rotation, and scaling), projection, vector additions and multiplications, matrix operations, dot and cross products, parametric curves and surfaces, viewing conventions.

Group Project

This module aims to provide students with the experience of working as part of a team on a development project. Students will produce a set of deliverables relevant to their programme of study, including a finished product or artefact. Final deliverables will be negotiated between the group and their supervisor, the module coordinator will be responsible for ensuring that each project covers the learning outcomes of the module. Groups are expected to manage their own processes, and to hold regular meetings both with and without their supervisor. Groups will be allocated by the module coordinator and other members of staff. The process of development of the artefact and the interaction and management of group members underpins the assessment of skills in the module.

Human-Computer Interaction

In this module students will form an appreciation of the importance of human factors and user-centred approaches in the development of technological systems (analysis, design, implementation and evaluation of technological systems). Students will be introduced to the physiological, psychological and cognitive issues relevant to human computer interaction and user-interface design.

Object-Oriented Programming

This module provides a comprehensive analysis of the general principles and practices of advanced programming with respect to software development. Notions and techniques of advanced programming are emphasised in the context of analysis, design and implementation of software and algorithms. Great importance is placed upon the Object-Oriented paradigm and related concepts applied to algorithm and software development.

Professional Practice

Professional Practice aims to develop an understanding of the basic cultural, social, legal, and ethical issues inherent in the discipline of computing; and to promote personal professionalism in the workplace. Examples of topics covered include:

  • The special nature of technological ethics.
  • Ethical decision-making and case analysis.
  • Ethics of software development.
  • Legal issues in the field of technology.
  • Codes of computer ethics and professional practice.
  • Globalisation of professionalism.
  • Professional engagement with the job applications process.

Level 3

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (Option)

The module introduces the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.

Business Intelligence (Option)

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to technologies, applications, and practices for the collection, integration, analysis, and presentation of meaningful and useful information for business purposes. The purpose of the module is to understand the issues involved in the use and application of these ‘tools’ and how BI might be applied to generate creative and novel insight helping support better business decisions. BI systems are data-driven Decision Support Systems. They provide historical, current, predictive and insightful views of business operations, most often using data gathered from data warehouses. Software elements support reporting, interactive 'slice-and-dice' pivot-table analyses, visualization, and statistical data mining.

Critical Perspectives on Project Management (Option)

The module Critical Perspectives on Project Management explores the practical issues and challenges of putting technology to work. As technology grows and becomes ever more pervasive, the size, complexity and timescales of related projects grow too. The challenges facing project managers involved in planning, coordinating, directing and implementing technology based projects on-time, to budget and operationally as expected is ever growing. This module develops a critical perspective of project management and uses case based material to develop an understanding about the various challenges project management in this arena presents. Students are encouraged to reflect on the limits of certain forms of rational project management modes in conditions that are more accurately described in terms of uncertainty, complexity, risk and chaos.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 1 (Option)

This module provides the business context for activities supported by and delivered through computing technologies. Students investigate the drivers for modern Electronic Business and consider enterprise applications from a business viewpoint. Students will explore the process of taking a technologically grounded idea, and develop a business case through break-even point to where profitability begins and specify an appropriate web site as the vehicle to deliver the business case. The Entrepreneurial perspective considers business development as a holistic process, students will engage with this notion throughout the module. The module will also draw upon examples and themes from social computing, the importance of which is growing rapidly in importance.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 2 (Option)

This module builds on the principles of Entrepreneurship & Innovation I and applies formalised methods and approaches in the exploration of specific areas of entrepreneurship and innovation. The module will also investigate the application of social computing principles, game theory and cooperation analysis in the development of an entrepreneurial idea.

Game Engine Architectures

The term 'Game Engine' is widely used to describe the core software used to create a computer game, which typically combines key modules of functionality including graphics rendering, audio, player interface, physics simulation, non-player character control, and multiplayer game code. Students will have already studied some of these component functionalities in previous modules.

In this module, students will study advanced topics related to the development, structure, design, and use of professional-standard game engine software. This will primarily focus on technical aspects, including algorithms and optimisation, as well as software engineering issues such as code interface design, and cross-platform support. Previously studied topics, such as rendering, user interfaces, and AI will be revisited within this context. Students will look at various examples of open-source and commercial engines, and undertake practical work in lab sessions which will include analysis and modification of existing game engines.

Image Processing (Option)

Digital image processing techniques are used in a wide variety of application areas such as computer vision, robotics, remote sensing, industrial inspection, medical imaging, etc. It is the study of any algorithms that take image as an input and returns useful information as output. This module aims to provide a broad introduction to the field of image processing, culminating in a practical understanding of how to apply and combine techniques to various image-related applications. The students will be able to extract useful data from the raw image and interpret the image data. The techniques will be implemented using the mathematical programming language Matlab or OpenCV.

Mobile Computing (Option)

This module provides students with knowledge in the design, development, and evaluation of cloud-connected mobile applications using industry standard tools and guidelines. Mobile device platforms – smartphones - provide a rich development experience with direct access to a number of pervasive sensors such as GPS, camera, proximity, NFC and multiple network connectivity channels. These sensors are used as building blocks for lifestyle-supporting mobile applications in areas such as health, fitness, social, science, and entertainment. Such applications are now seen as part of the everyday fabric of life. Students will learn how to develop topically-themed mobile applications that consume cloud-connected web services. Data privacy and security issues are discussed throughout the module. Access to smartphone technologies globally, feature phone vs. smartphone comparison and users of such devices, access constraints to data and other services - such as local government and banking.

Parallel Computing (Option)

Parallel Computing is a very important, modern paradigm in Computer Science, which is a promising direction for keeping up with the expected exponential growth in the discipline. Executing multiple processes at the same time can tremendously increase the computational throughput not only benefitting scientific computations but also leading to new exciting applications like real-time animated 3d graphics, video processing, physics simulation, etc. The relevance of parallel computing is especially prominent due to availability of modern, affordable computer hardware utilising multi-core and/or large number of massively parallel units.

Physics Simulation

Realistic physics simulation is a key component for many modern technologies including computer games, video animation, medical imaging, robotics, etc. This wide range of applications benefiting from real-time physics simulation is a result of recent advances in developing new efficient simulation techniques and the common availability of powerful hardware. The main application area considered in this module is computer games, but the taught content has much wider relevance and can be applied to other areas of Computer Science.

Project (Computer Science)

This module provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate their ability to work independently on an in-depth project with an implementation element that builds on their established knowledge, understanding and skills. Students will normally be expected to demonstrate their ability to apply practical and analytical skills, innovation and/or creativity, and to be able to synthesise information, ideas and practices to provide a problem solution. Self-management is a key concept here, as is the ability to engage in critical self-evaluation.

Software Engineering (Option)

The module covers advanced topics of Software Engineering, focusing on software methodologies, with respect to changes in the software development process including past and present techniques. Key Software Engineering principles are explored in the context of real world software engineering challenges such as software evolution and reuse. Topics such as advanced testing, verification and validation, critical systems development, re-factoring and design patterns will be covered.

Masters Level

Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Option)

This module covers the theoretical fundamentals and practical applications of decision-making, problem-solving and learning abilities in software agents. Search is introduced as a unifying framework for Artificial Intelligence (AI), followed by key topics including blind and informed search algorithms, planning and reasoning, both with certain and uncertain (e.g. probabilistic) knowledge. Practical exercises in AI programming will complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems.

Advanced Programming (Option)

This module will explore advanced topics using a contemporary object-oriented programming language. The objective is to prepare students for professional-level programming in scientific and commercial computing, and to support programming tasks in other modules of this award.
Students will explore a range of programming topics through a series of lectures and practical workshops, and will work on producing an individual programming assignment.

Advanced Software Engineering (Option)

This module provides students with advanced concepts of Software Engineering principles and practices. Students will explore up-to-date methodologies and their application to real-world products and services will be covered.

Indicative topics of study will include (but are not limited to):
• Agile methods of software engineering;
• Requirements engineering, design, software components, software reuse, verification and validation, maintenance and configuration management, software evolution;
• Critical system development and the ethical implications of software engineering;
• Fault Tree Analysis.

Computer Vision (Option)

This module will explore current methodologies in the field of computer vision, covering a range of aspects in capturing, processing, analysing and interpreting rich visual content. The aim is to offer students with a deep understanding and to allow an exposure to the latest developments in computer vision, equipping them with knowledge in practical depth. The module will also provide training in programming skills (e.g. Matlab), tools and methods that are necessary for the implementation of computer vision systems.
The module will also cover applications of computer vision in various fields, such as in object recognition/tracking, medical image analysis, multimedia indexing and retrieval and intelligent surveillance systems, allowing the students to establish a full awareness to the technology advance in this rapidly evolving field

Machine Learning (Option)

This module covers the theoretical fundamentals and practical application of machine learning algorithms, including supervised, unsupervised, reinforcement and evolutionary learning. Practical programming exercises complement and apply the theoretical knowledge acquired to real-world problems such as data mining.

Mobile and Connected Devices (Option)

This module explores the cutting-edge computing concepts and in-the-field deployment of emerging Internet of Things (IoT) platforms and devices. The module will investigate, through practical implementation, the low-barrier capture, communication, and highly scalable consumption of data from geographically dispersed physical objects and sensors, with a view to creating novel end-user experiences. Physical objects can now be easily connected to the internet and other objects through small, low-power, and inexpensive lightweight computing devices; creating hugely scalable networks of ‘things’ that can interoperate and stream data using simple web standards such as REST. IoT enabled objects and infrastructure can enable unforeseen opportunities for novel application scenarios, data collection and consumption, as well as create new markets around open data and third party applications. Additionally, the module will cover how emerging capability such as locative and context aware technology can be exploited in cloud-connected prototypes and mobile applications. In terms of practical development, special attention is given to: creating data stream assets from sensor boards and smartphones, building a cloud information hub to store sensor data, and developing cloud services for consumption by mobile and other third party applications. Students will be asked to design and prototype IoT enabled applications, based on themed societal issues, using a combination of development boards and sensors, cloud computing services, and mobile applications.

Level 4

Advanced Graphics

This module enhances students understanding of concepts and theory around computer graphics, as well as enhancing their practical techniques. Advanced techniques available for graphics processing units (GPUs) are exploring along with their practical implementation.

Autonomous Mobile Robotics (M) (Option)

The module introduces the main concepts of Autonomous Mobile Robotics, providing an understanding of the range of processing components required to build physically embodied robotic systems, from basic control architectures to spatial navigation in real-world environments. Students will be introduced to relevant theoretical concepts around robotic sensing and control in the lectures, together with a practical “hands on” approach to robot programming in the workshops.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Business Intelligence (M) (Option)

Business Intelligence (BI) refers to technologies, applications, and practices for the collection, integration, analysis, and presentation of meaningful and useful information for business purposes. The purpose of the module is to understand the issues involved in the use and application of these ‘tools’ and how BI might be applied to generate creative and novel insight helping support better business decisions. BI systems are data-driven Decision Support Systems. They provide historical, current, predictive and insightful views of business operations, most often using data gathered from data warehouses. Software elements support reporting, interactive 'slice-and-dice' pivot-table analyses, visualization, and statistical data mining.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Critical Perspectives on Project Management (M) (Option)

The module Critical Perspectives on Project Management explores the practical issues and challenges of putting technology to work. As technology grows and becomes ever more pervasive, the size, complexity and timescales of related projects grow too. The challenges facing project managers involved in planning, coordinating, directing and implementing technology based projects on-time, to budget and operationally as expected is ever growing. This module develops a critical perspective of project management and uses case based material to develop an understanding about the various challenges project management in this arena presents. Students are encouraged to reflect on the limits of certain forms of rational project management modes in conditions that are more accurately described in terms of uncertainty, complexity, risk and chaos.
Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Data Analytics and Visualisation (Option)

This module develops students’ understanding of contemporary approaches to data analysis and visualisation. The module places particular emphasis on making sense of large datasets such as those generated from social media interactions or other web sources. It delivers material on the fundamental understanding of human visual perception and the political and persuasive power of data, and develops this alongside the use of standard tools for data collection, processing, manipulation, analysis and visual presentation. The practical role of data analytics and visualisation in media and business contexts is a core thread running through the module.

Entrepreneurship and Innovation 1 (M) (Option)

In this module students investigate the drivers for modern Electronic Business and consider enterprise applications from a business viewpoint. Students will explore the process of taking a technologically grounded idea and develop a business case to the point where profitability begins. Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

MComp Research Project

The MComp Research Project is an individual piece of work that requires students to apply and integrate theoretical knowledge and practical skills from the breadth of their experience with computer science sub-disciplines, in order to address a specific research question or questions formulated with support from academic staff.

The form and nature of this project is negotiable, but at MComp Level 4 there are typically three types of Project that are undertaken:

  • Industrial Based Project work (typically engaged with through a work placement)
  • Client-based project delivery (typically with an approved client in either public, private or third sector partners, and with a clearly articulated delivery)
  • A research based project (typically done in conjunction with a member of academic staff in the School and with a clear linkage to research activity of the staff member but which could include collaborative projects with research groups at other Universities)

The student will undertake work that is predominantly relevant to the ongoing research in one of the established research centres within the School of Computer Science. In all cases the Project supervisor will ensure that the study undertaken is suitably grounded within the programme title of each student.

Movement Interfaces

Recent years have seen growing interest in games interfaces that require movement of the body, and build on the user’s physical skills and abilities; the new dimension introduces a unique set of challenges in the design of games that extends beyond traditional human-computer interaction. This module provides students with advanced understanding of theoretical and practical concerns related to the design of technology that recognizes, captures and visualizes player movement. A number of inter-disciplinary perspectives on designing for player movement are considered, such as accessibility of games for players with mobility impairments, sports, performance, dance and audience. In addition, students will engage with practical issues related to the design, development and evaluation of movement-based games.

Software Engineering (M) (Option)

The module covers advanced topics of Software Engineering, focusing on software methodologies, with respect to changes in the software development process including past and present techniques. Key Software Engineering principles are explored in the context of real world software engineering challenges such as software evolution and reuse. Topics including advanced testing, verification and validation, critical systems development, re-factoring and design patterns will be covered.
Current research in Software Engineering will be discussed with the expectation of researching recent software engineering concepts. Working at Masters level, students will research the area in depth and produce critical reports of their findings.

Special Features & Research Highlights

Overseas study visits have been a feature of our courses in recent years. Visits to locations within the United States provide students with a unique insight into games development issues in overseas territories.

Student as Producer

Student as Producer is a development of the University of Lincoln's policy of research-informed teaching to research-engaged teaching. Research-engaged teaching involves more research and research-like activities at the core of the undergraduate curriculum. A significant amount of teaching at the University of Lincoln is already research-engaged.

Student as Producer will make research-engaged teaching an institutional priority, across all colleges and subject areas. In this way students become part of the academic project of the University and collaborators with academics in the production of knowledge and meaning. Research-engaged teaching is grounded in the intellectual history and tradition of the modern university.

Please visit the Student as Producer website for further information. [http://studentasproducer.lincoln.ac.uk/]

Facilities

The University of Lincoln has a specialised development laboratory, industry-standard software development environments, three-dimensional modelling software, motion capture systems and games distribution platforms. Console development environments are available with systems including Dreamspark, Rift and Unity Pro software.

Career Opportunities

Games Computing graduates work as tools programmers, artificial intelligence programmers, level designers, mission scripters, games testers and many other roles in the wider IT industry. Lincoln graduates have gone on to work for some of the computer games industry giants, as well as for nice companies in the sector. Previous graduate destinations include Electronic Arts (EA Games), Criterion Games, Rockstar, Sumo Digital and Team 17.

Careers Service

While you are at the University of Lincoln, you will have different services at your disposal that will help you best prepare for your future career.

The University's Careers & Employability Team offers qualified advisors who can work with you to provide tailored, individual support and careers advice during your time at the University and once you graduate.

This service includes one-to-one coaching, CV advice and interview preparation to help you maximise your future opportunities. Having achieved new knowledge and skills, you will be fully supported to fulfil your career ambitions.

The service works closely with local, national and international employers, acting as a gateway to the business world. It advertises a range of graduate positions around the country.

Visit our Careers Service pages for further information. [http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/campuslife/studentsupport/careersservice/]

What's Included?

At the University of Lincoln, we provide access to excellent teaching and learning facilities, library materials, laboratories, laboratory equipment, consumables and IT equipment that you would expect to find included in your tuition fee.

In addition, we cover other necessary costs associated with modules which are a compulsory part of your course. These compulsory items are included in your tuition fee.

Fees

2014 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £13,648 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point £114 per credit point
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

2015 Entry UK/EUInternational
Full-time £9,000 per level £14,522 per level
Part-time £75 per credit point £121 per credit point
Placement (optional) Exempt Exempt

 

For further information and for details about funding your study, please see our UK/EU Fees & Funding pages or our International funding and scholarship pages. [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/studyatlincoln/undergraduatecourses/feesandfunding/] [www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/international/feesandfunding/internationalscholarships/]

The University intends to provide its courses as outlined in these pages. Occasionally provision may be altered in order to meet changing circumstances or to keep courses up to date with trends and developments in subject areas. Specific programme queries should be directed to the teaching department. Fees for all our courses may increase each year in line with government regulations and are subject to change.


Always check our website for the latest information about entry tariffs, fees & funding before making your application to the University.