PhD Studentships

UoL Eng 035 by E Egg Oct16

Providing Research Opportunities

The quality and breadth of research at the University of Lincoln was highlighted in the Research Excellence Framework 2014, where more than half of the University’s submitted research was rated as internationally excellent or world leading (3* or 4*). If you undertake a PhD studentship here at Lincoln, you too could join this community of world-leading researchers.

At the University of Lincoln, our PhD students are committed to making research breakthroughs and inspiring those around them, and we are committed to helping them achieve their goals. That’s why the University is making a significant investment to provide research opportunities for exceptional doctoral candidates through our annual half-million pound Research Investment Fund.

Studentships

View our current studentship opportunities:

College of Social Science

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-3

Project Leads: Dr Stephen Turner; Professor Duncan French

PhD GTA Funded Studentship in "Global Environmental Governance - the development of solutions in the field of corporate reporting and accountability that relate to environmental, social and governance issues"

Applicants with a sound understanding of corporate law and global environmental governance are eligible to apply. The successful candidate should demonstrate a strong aptitude for the development of solutions in the field of corporate reporting and accountability that relate to environmental, social and governance issues. Ideally the successful candidate will also have a practical awareness of the broader legal, commercial and economic factors that affect developments in this area.

Contact Dr Stephen Turner: +44(0)1522 835646stturner@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

PhD GTS Funded Studentship

Reference number: COSS2018-1

Project Leads: Dr Jennifer Johnston; Dr Rachael Sharpe

Pathways into teaching: Maximising regional mathematics and science teachers’ recruitment and retention post Initial Teacher Training (ITT)

This cross-disciplinary project will investigate the different pathways (for example Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) only, School Centred Initial Teacher Training (SCITT) and the traditional University-led PGCE) in preparing mathematics and science teachers to teach in the secondary schools in the UK. This research will explore pre-service and service teachers' attitudes regarding their views of their preparation for teaching, their beliefs and practice, and their plans to remain in teaching. Applicants from education, teacher education or related areas are eligible to apply.

Contact Dr Jennifer Johnston: +44(0)1522 886246jjohnston@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although International students must self-fund the difference between the international and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-2

Project Leads: Professor Graham Law; Dr Simon Durrant

Sleep research, and metabolic health

The successful candidate will join an active research team working on how sleep interacts with metabolic health. The team run a two-bedroom sleep laboratory, which will be used to collect data. In particular the team are working on a gadget that can be worn to improve deep sleep, with the anticipation this will improve blood sugar control in people with diabetes. Experience in scientific research in relation to health and in particular sleep will be desirable but not essential. Strong scientific qualities will be essential.

Contact Professor Graham Law: glaw@lincoln.ac.uk

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-4

Project Leads: Dr Kay Ritchie; Dr Robin Kramer; Dr Bonaventura Majolo

Social contexts and face perception.

The successful applicant will investigate the influence of social contexts and social motivation on face memory, face recognition and first impression formation. We know from previous research that perceptual factors such as the variability between images of the same person’s face can influence face learning. This project aims to investigate social factors underlying face perception. For example if you are in a queue in a shop, there is little motivation to learn and commit to memory the faces of each of your fellow queue members. However if you join a new workplace, it is important for you to quickly learn who is who. This project will use face learning, recognition and matching paradigms among others to investigate social motivations that are important for face processing.

The School of Psychology has just moved into a new purpose-built building with an extensive range of well-equipped, dedicated research facilities. These include a new 3D scanner which can take 3D pictures of faces and bodies which can then be morphed to alter different features.

Applicants from psychology or related areas are eligible to apply. Experience in experimental design is essential and using software such as MATLAB is desirable. Prior research experience in face processing would be an advantage.

Contact Dr Kay Ritchie: +44(0)1522 835463kritchie@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young ( studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk ). Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.


PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-8

Project Leads: Dr Louise O’Hare; Dr Patrick Dickinson; Dr Adrian Parke

Virtual reality: immersion, self-regulation, discomfort

“Aim: To investigate the role of immersion, self-regulation and discomfort in virtual reality using head-mounted visual displays.”

This is a multi-disciplinary project investigating the experience of virtual reality. The aim of the project is to investigate physiological and psychological aspects of virtual reality using head-mounted visual displays.

Virtual reality (VR) is becoming increasingly popular, with applications for training, recreation and the in the games industry. Virtual reality devices such as head-mounted visual displays are becoming increasingly popular due to technological advances and reduced costs. Increasing popularity might indicate that more time will be spent using such devices.

Head-mounted visual displays are thought by some to be more immersive than other displays, e.g. desktop displays (e.g. Diemer et al., 2015). Immersion might have positive outcomes as a training tool (e.g. Dede, 2009). However, there are also potential negative outcomes of immersive environments, for example a reduced ability to self-regulate the amount of time spent in virtual reality (Jennett et al., 2008). There are also some potential side effects of head-mounted displays, due to the challenge they pose for the visual system. Such potential side effects might include eyestrain, headache, balance and motor co-ordination issues.

Whilst motion sickness in virtual reality (particularly head-mounted visual displays) has been extensively studied, there is less research on individual variation in susceptibility to visual discomfort in head mounted visual displays from other sources, e.g. impact of display quality, and the individual variation in susceptibility to visual discomfort. It is possible that immersive tasks might reduce the individual’s ability to self-regulate time spent in virtual reality, thus potentially increasing the likelihood of negative consequences. The focus of this project is to look at the interplay between immersion, self-regulation and discomfort in head-mounted visual displays.

This PhD will give students the opportunity to investigate human-computer interactions, with expertise in both visual and psychological factors for investigating human experience, and will help them develop their technical expertise using modern display technology. The project will involve measuring subjective judgements using a variety of behavioural methods, for example psychophysical methods, as well as measuring the objective correlates of these subjective judgements. Subjective perceptions of presence and immersion, the ability to regulate the length of time playing and the negative consequences of challenging visual stimuli, and how these interact will be investigated.

The role of individual variation in immersion and discomfort from head-mounted visual displays will also be taken into account. This is a collaboration between the Schools of Psychology and Computer Science and the candidate should share the interest in applied research. Applicants should have a strong background in either psychology, computer science, engineering or other related discipline. An understanding of mathematics and statistics is desirable. Experience of programming e.g. MATLAB/Python would be an advantage. Contact Dr Louise O’Hare: LOHare@lincoln.ac.uk.

Dede, C. (2009). Immersive interfaces for engagement and learning. Science323(5910), 66-69.

Diemer, J., Alpers, G. W., Peperkorn, H. M., Shiban, Y., Mühlberger, A., (2015). The impact of perception and presence on emotional reactions: a review of research in virtual reality. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, 26.

Jennett, C., Cox, A. L., Cairns, P., Dhoparee, S., Epps, A., Tijs, T., & Walton, A. (2008). Measuring and defining the experience of immersion in games. International journal of human-computer studies, 66(9), 641-661.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-6

Project Leads: Dr Patricia Jackman; Daniel Martin; Dr Lee Crust 

Low energy availability and psychophysiological functioning in exercising females

Low energy availability and psychophysiological functioning in exercising females: Psychological health was recently proposed as a factor that may be influenced by low energy availability in exercising females, although research in this area is limited. The successful applicant will adopt an interdisciplinary approach to investigate psychophysiological factors related to the health of exercising females with low energy availability. Applicants with a good honours degree in sport and exercise science, psychology or related areas are welcomed. A strong understanding of psychophysiological research methods and experience of psychological, physiological or psychophysiological research is desirable. Contact Patricia Jackman: +44(0)1522837105 ; pjackman@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews:  w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.


PhD Funded Studentship

Location: University of Lincoln, UK (primary), and University of Copenhagen, Denmark

Reference Number: COSS2017-9

Project Leads: Dr Hannah Henderson; Dr Adam Evans; Professor Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson

Sociology of ageing, exercise and cardiac rehabilitation

Participation and adherence to Phase IV exercise-based Cardiac Rehabilitation remains low, even amongst those with a direct referral. These trends are particularly notable amongst older participants. This research project will investigate older participants’ perceptions and experiences of age-related cardiac illness, exercise and identity, including how socioeconomic, ethnic and gendered factors influence how older participants perceive and rationalise their embodied health in relation to physical activity, healthcare and risk of illness.  We are seeking an outstanding postgraduate student, working from a sociological perspective, to undertake a ‘double’ PhD in the School of Sport and Exercise Science, University Lincoln and the Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport, University of Copenhagen. The PhD will be awarded by both Universities and co-supervised by Dr Henderson, Professor Allen-Collinson (Lincoln) and Dr Evans (Copenhagen). Contact: Dr Hannah Henderson: hhenderson@lincoln.ac.uk or Dr Adam Evans: abe@nexs.ku.dk

Applicants should have a first or high upper second-class honours degree, and a relevant Master’s degree in sociology or sport sociology, with substantial experience of qualitative research, excellent writing and English language communication skills, ability to work to deadlines and be willing to stay in Copenhagen for extended periods.  

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 15 February 2018

Interviews: TBC

Start date: 1 April 2018 or as soon as possible thereafter

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

Funding: £14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate, plus payment of Home/EU tuition fees and £1,500 per annum research budget.

PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-5

Project Leads: Dr Sundari Anitha; Dr Agnieszka Rydzik; Dr Catherine Bochel

Women workers’ experiences in the gig economy.

The successful candidate will investigate women workers’ experiences, including issues of security, flexibility, labour process and pay/conditions within the gig economy. What are the processes through which women workers manage their productive and reproductive labour within this ‘flexible’ mode of employment? How can an intersectional perspective inform our understanding of women’s agency and constraints within a polarised labour market? To what extent do existing regulatory mechanisms respond to the challenges posed by changing contemporary landscapes of employment? Applicants with a background in sociology, industrial relations, business studies, labour geography and gender studies are all eligible to apply. We also welcome applications from candidates with postgraduate qualifications who have experience in relevant practice environments.

Contact Dr Sundari Anitha: sanitha@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

An application of a one-page CV and one-page covering letter including a brief insight into the research topic area should be emailed to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form, and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.


PhD GTA Funded Studentship

Reference Number: COSS2018-7

Project Leads: Dr Joshua Skoczylis; Dr Julie Van de Vyver; Professor Peter Somerville

The social context of radicalisation

Extremism and political violence are influenced not only by personal beliefs, but also by the wider social context in which individuals live in. We are looking for an applicant who is interested in investigating the impact that this wider socio-economic context has on radicalisation and resulting extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours. Your project might examine the impact of the real and/or perceived grievances, such as social injustice, socio-economic inequality, government policy, and cultural and political factors and how these shape individuals' radicalisation journey and resulting extreme behaviours, attitudes and actions. As part of your project you may further consider how the internet has (re)shaped on and offline social interactions and influences radicalisation.

You should be confident in statistical analyses (e.g. using SPSS or R) and also be willing to carrying out qualitative research. Applicants from with a background in Social Sciences and Social Psychology are all eligible to apply.

Please contact Dr Joshua Skoczylis +44(0)1522 886122Jskoczylis@lincoln.ac.uk.

Applicants should have a first or upper second-class honours degree or equivalent in a relevant area. Applicants with a relevant Master's are particularly welcome. Applicants should possess excellent report writing and English language communication skills and an ability to work to deadlines.

Please email your CV (no longer than two pages) and a one-page cover letter to Maureen Young at studentshipscss@lincoln.ac.uk. Those called for interview will be required to complete an online application form, and prepare a presentation. Please quote the project ID in the subject line of the email.

Closing Date: 26 February 2018

Interviews: w/c 19 March 2018

Start date: 3 September 2018

Suitably qualified candidates worldwide may apply, although international students must self-fund the difference between the International and UK/EU fee rate.

£14,553 (2017/18) per annum stipend – stipend will be paid at the 2018/19 RCUK rate.

The studentship may require you to do up to six hours of teaching or related work per week, the income from which will go towards the cost of your tuition fees and any surplus fees will be paid by the College.

Cat Banner

“I am currently halfway through my PhD research in which I am exploring the nature of wandering cats and cat management in the UK; paying close attention to electronic containment fences for cats and assessing their potential welfare implications. Through my work with the School of Life Sciences, I had the chance to appear on a BBC documentary in which the team and I were filmed exploring the hidden life of the domestic cat. This provided a great opportunity to disseminate our research to the broader public and the programme was well received by a national audience. I came to Lincoln as I was interested in joining a university that is making incredible gains. The University puts in a lot of effort to provide tailored support for its postgraduate students.”

Kevin Mahon, PhD student in the School of Life Sciences

The Doctoral School

The Doctoral School at the University of Lincoln provides a highly collegiate setting where our postgraduates can enjoy support for their research studies, as well as acclimatise and integrate into academic life. It is a dedicated department for postgraduate students promoting the opportunities for postgraduate activities and championing the interests of postgraduate students throughout the University. The Doctoral School offers education and training courses for both students and academic colleagues, monitors student satisfaction, hosts networking and social events, and organises an annual Postgraduate Student Conference. Our aim is to fully engage the postgraduate community and support and enhance the student journey.

MichaelMoseleyEdit

Dr Michael Mosley

Dr Michael Mosley gave a recent talk at the University of Lincoln as part of our Great Lives series. He is a science presenter, writer and executive producer and his work includes BBC2’s The Story of Science, The Truth About Exercise, and Eat, Fast & Live Longer – which led to the hugely popular 5:2 diet.

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